MIT

The grants were made as part of the NSF's Enabling Discovery through Genomic Tools — or EDGE — program.

Dubbed "Sherlock," the new technology has demonstrated potential in detecting viruses and bacteria as well as human SNPs and mutations in cell-free DNA.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: model to determine methylation effects of noncoding variants, Neisseria meningitides transcriptomics, and more.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: genetic hints of adaptive evolution in Atlantic herring, ancestry of ancient individuals from the Pacific Northwest, and more.

This Week in Cell

In Cell this week: genomic events that could make attenuated polio virulent, formation of regulatory RNAs, and more.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: high-altitude adaptation signature among Tibetans, de novo mutations in early-onset high myopia, and more.

Speakers at the conference's opening plenary showed how their work in cancer research fit into the broad theme of 'Discover, Predict, Prevent, Treat.'

The MIT researchers said that the mutational signature could be used to identify people exposed to aflatoxin who are at risk of developing liver cancer.

The Broad Institute's lawyers used statements from Jennifer Doudna to undermine UC's case that one could expect CRISPR/Cas9 to work in eukaryotic cells.

The platform, called Seq-Well, is similar to droplet-based approaches but reports increased efficiency.

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Technology Review reports that researchers in the US have used CRISPR to modify a number of human embryos.

Plant researchers plan to sequence some 10,000 samples that represent the major plant clades, ScienceInsider reports.

By introducing genes from butterfly peas and Canterbury bells, researchers in Japan have developed a blue chrysanthemum, according to NPR.

In Nature this week: a Danish reference genome, and more.