MIT | GenomeWeb


Two Broad Institute teams, led by Eric Lander and Feng Zhang, respectively, have published new papers today in Science on new uses for lenti-CRISPR screens.

Researchers are making mutations in a cell's genome to mark it and later read out that information to create cell lineage maps and chemical interaction histories.

The method works by adding noise to database search results to confound algorithms that try to access private details about contributing individuals.

The Food Allergy Science Initiative seeks to supply the basic scientific research needed to spur future development of diagnostics and therapeutics.

Discovered and characterized through a collaboration between Feng Zhang's lab and the NCBI, C2c2 opens up the RNA world to editing and other applications.

Its first client, Haystack Bio, will use Genecloud to analyze and store single-cell genomics data for a proprietary platform it is developing for the immunotherapy market.

Researchers led by MIT's Jim Collins have built upon their paper-based Ebola test and are hoping to find a partner to help scale production and manufacturing of the test.

Tech-Transfer Maven

Lita Nelsen from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's technology-transfer office is retiring after decades there.

Fight, Fight, Fight!

The USPTO has become involved in the CRISPR-Cas9 patent dispute.

The patent office has named the Broad Institute, et al. as the junior party in the proceedings and the University of California, et al. as the senior party.


In Nature this week: genetic history of HIV in the US, and more.

There are a few projects aimed at addressing the lack of diversity in genomic research, Technology Review reports.

A national assessment shows that US students lag in the sciences, but suggests that achievement gaps are narrowing.

Harvard's George Church discusses HGP-write with the Journal of the American Medical Association.