MIT

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: machine learning-based method for CRISPR editing, symbiotic genes of Medicago truncatula, and more.

Using a mouse model of immunotherapy resistant disease, the researchers found that this program could be targeted by an inhibitor to improve response.

The MIT team found that a previously uncharacterized Cas9 from Streptococcus canis has fewer PAM requirements than the more widely used S. pyogenes Cas9.

Researchers describe a way to share data while keeping it secure, Agence France Presse reports.

The researchers found that the diversity of epithelial cell types was reduced in nasal polyps, which contained few glandular and ciliated cells and were enriched in basal cells.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: targeting recurrent IDH1 and IDH2 mutations in gliomas, silkworms genetically modified to produce spider silk, and more.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: expansion of disease-resistance genes among long-lived oak trees, and more.

By combining iPSCs, CRISPR gene editing, and transcriptomic approaches, researchers examined the effects of an Alzheimer's disease risk variant on brain cells.

MIT and Stanford computer scientists developed a technique for secure, massively scalable genomic analysis that they hope will unleash greater data sharing.

CRISPR Work Ahead

CBS News' 60 Minutes dives into CRISPR gene editing and how it could be used to treat disease.

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Germany's Project DEAL has come to an agreement with the publisher Wiley over journal access and open-access publishing, ScienceInsider reports.

Researchers uncover additional loci associated with lifespan, which the Telegraph says could be folded into a genetic test.

A Canadian panel recommends public coverage of the gene therapy Kymriah if its cost comes down, the Globe and Mail reports.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: new accurate quantification by sequencing approach, CNV breakpoints in Plasmodium falciparum, and more.