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Memorial Sloan-Kettering

This Week in Cell

In Cell this week: post-treatment changes to melanoma genome, multi-omics analysis of muscle-invasive bladder cancer, and more.

Researchers found that ADAR works by stabilizing the FAK gene, which is one of a subset involved in cell migration pathways.

Not Yet for Watson

Stat News reports that IBM's Watson for Oncology isn't yet living up to its promise.

Researchers from MSKCC reported today in JAMA that of 1,040 cancer patients referred for germline mutation testing, 18 percent had actionable variants.

This small, for-profit Dutch company has been a driving force behind freeing cBioPortal from Memorial Sloan Kettering, as well as continued development of the software.

Though researchers highlighted their goal of using the method to move toward a test to detect early cancers, their current data speaks only to the method's performance in late-stage cancer patients.

Philips has teamed with Illumina and Intermountain Healthcare's Navican on informatics for precision medicine and signed a genome analytics deal with Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

The company hopes to raise funding this summer and has been conducting pilots with NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: variability in iPSCs, the silver birch, and more.

More than a third of the first 10,000 patients receiving MSK-IMPACT harbored actionable mutations, and 11 percent of the first 5,000 enrolled in a clinical trial. 

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The American Prospect writes that the pilot program to test the DNA of migrants could lead to more family separations.

An international commission is to develop a report on how researchers, clinicians, and regulators should evaluate the clinical applications of human germline genome editing.

The US Department of Agriculture presents a new blueprint for animal genomic research.

In Genome Research this week: repetitive element deletion linked to altered methylation and more in form of muscular dystrophy; human contamination in draft bacterial and archaeal genomes; and more.