McGill University

With genealogical data for 3.4 million individuals from Quebec, investigators traced a rare heart and digestive disease back to two 17th century founder families.

In Genome Research this week: a physical and genetic map of Cannabis sativa, evaluation of family- and population-based imputation tools, and more.

Simulated population data suggests that the lifetime risk of cervical cancer is lower for women who stop screening after a negative DNA test for oncogenic HPV.

Using data for more than 500,000 individuals, researchers found 15 fracture-linked loci and saw genetic interactions between fracture and bone mineral density.

The effort aims to sequence at least 150 animals, plants, and microbes selected for their potential benefits to Canada in the next three years.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: tick salivary transcriptome, genetic risk scores for type 1 diabetes, and more.

Partnering with researchers at McGill University, the Johns Hopkins team that developed the method has now demonstrated its power in a much larger group of patients.

Genome Canada and its partners recently funded two new initiatives with C$255 that will back precision medicine, genomics, and technology development.

Stat News reports that researchers are not good at predicting whether a clinical trial will be successful.

In a study of nearly 45,000 people, researchers found that two variants in LPA each increase aortic stenosis risk by about a third, and about twofold in combination.

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A genome-wide association study highlights a potential role for hair follicles in acne risk, according to New Scientist.

Newsday reports that breast cancer genetic testing guidelines for are out of date and may miss individuals.

In Cell this week: gene editing-based strategy to screen for immune system regulators, ancient plague patterns, and more.

Publication of He Jiankui's work on gene-edited infants would raise ethical concerns for journals, Wired and others report.