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McGill University

Researchers have released new tools for analyzing epigenomic data as part of the International Human Epigenome Consortium.

Using genotyping data, a McGill University-led team examined the ancestry and movements of African-American populations.

Nearly 8,000 patients participated in a screening study that used a PCR-based detection assay from Becton Dickinson, uncovering a 5 percent carrier rate.

Two recent studies confirm that CRISPR/Cas9 can edit and inhibit latent HIV provirus, but one of them hints that the virus can develop resistance to excision.

Genome sequence data revealed a single Mycobacterium tuberculosis introduction to northern Quebec in the early 20th century, without a subsequent rise in virulence.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: UK10K project data enables study of novel variants, and more.

The researchers published a proof of principle in Nature Communications of a panel designed to look at epigenetic variation in adipose tissue and are using it to study obesity and metabolic syndromes. 

Speakers at the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities annual meeting discussed their approaches for single-cell genomic studies of tumor and immune cells.

The approach could allow the use of antibody array tests in resource-poor areas where fluorescence detection systems are too expensive or difficult to maintain.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – In Nature Genetics, Spanish researchers reported on the recombination events contributing to Legionella pneumophila outbreaks in Spain over more than a decade.

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In PLOS this week: a sequencing-based screen of Lyme disease-causing pathogen, the range of animals bitten by Anopheles darling mosquitoes in Peru, and more.

An NC State researcher is exploring the use of CRISPR-Cas3 as an anti-microbial, Gizmodo reports.

The Earth BioGenome Project plans to sequence all life on Earth, according to ScienceInsider.

For those who are concerned about Trump administration actions related to science, a new column in Scientific American has suggestions for ways to fight back.