Max Planck

In Genome Biology this week: methylation-based predictor of age in mice, population genetics of the common bean, and more.

Left on the Floor

Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology researchers are searching for ancient human DNA in the dirt of cave floors, NPR reports.

Analysis of a gene associated with basal progenitor cell expansions in the brain suggests a single splice site change led to human-specific forms of the gene transcript.

The researchers said the bones likely belonged to individuals who were among the latest Neanderthals in Western Europe.

Using a sixth century sample from Germany, researchers reconstructed a high-coverage genome sequence for the Yersinia pestis strain involved in the Justinian plague. 

Barley field in Lancaster County, Penn.

An international team of researchers sequenced 6,000-year-old barley grains from the Judean Desert.

Arnold Böcklin: The Plague (1898)

Max Planck researchers traced the plague from the Mediterranean to Northern Europe, Russia, and China.

The transient transcriptome sequencing protocol relies on combining sequencing with 4-thiouridine labeling and RNA fragmentation.

The Wellcome Trust, the Max Planck Society, and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute will continue to support the open-access journal eLife, according to Nature News.

On the Go

The New York Times writes that the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology's Emmanuelle Charpentier has always been on the move, though now it's more about CRISPR.

Pages

A fire at a Manchester hospital may have destroyed lab equipment and data, the Guardian reports.

Researchers generate a genetic database from skeletal remains from the 1845 Franklin Expedition to the Arctic, Live Science reports.

Researchers in China have begun another trial using CRISPR/Cas9 approaches in cancer patients, according to the Wall Street Journal.

In Science this week: human DNA found in sediments from archeological sites lacking bones, and more.