Max Planck

Researchers sequenced 45 individuals from the Caucasus and steppe region between 3,500 and 6,500 years ago, teasing out distinct populations and shared relationships.

In a new policy paper, investigators outlined existing challenges to public data sharing and touted the benefits of increasing openness before and after publication.

Researchers traced genomic, epigenomic, and expression features in lung carcinoma in situ cases that regressed or progressed to invasive lung squamous cell carcinomas.

The researchers found that low-frequency variants in TP53 had a large effect on head circumference and volume, suggesting a previously unknown role for the gene.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: new accurate quantification by sequencing approach, CNV breakpoints in Plasmodium falciparum, and more.

Researchers also found that Neanderthals differed from humans more in the regulatory than protein-coding sequences of their genomes.

The researchers generated a skull shape score and applied it to a European ancestry cohort to tease out introgressed Neanderthal DNA linked to head shape.

An international team of researchers used ancient and modern genome sequences to examine the admixture and population history of Finland.

A human-Neanderthal admixture event likely occurred before East Asian and European lineages diverged, while later events involved only East Asian or European lineages.

Three studies encompassing dozens of ancient genomes are offering a closer look at complex historical population spread in North, Central, and South America.

Pages

Thermo Fisher Scientific says it will no longer sell machines in China's Xinjiang region, according to the Wall Street Journal.

New Scientist reports that 20 percent of human and yeast proteins are uncharacterized.

The University of Zurich's Ruedi Aebersold and his colleagues analyzed a dozen HeLa cell lines to find differences in gene expression, protein levels, and more.

In Nature this week: protein-coding variants associated with body-fat distribution, and more.