Max Planck

A Max Planck-led team sequenced three dozen ancient humans found in the Baltic to unravel the region's population history.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: genomes of two organisms that regenerate body parts, sea lamprey genome, and more.

Researchers hope the genomes of the Mexican axolotl and the Schmidtea mediterranea worms will facilitate further studies on the processes behind regeneration. 

At PAG, researchers from the Rockefeller University Vertebrate Genome Laboratory outlined sequencing and assembly strategies for phase 1 of the VGP G10K.

Max Planck researchers screened metagenomic data from samples from an outbreak-era Mexican cemetery to find Salmonella enterica DNA.

A mitochondrial genome- and Y chromosome marker-based analysis suggests the Chachapoyas population was not completely replaced by Incas as previously believed.

Max Planck researchers reconstructed the genomes of six Yersinia pestis samples that date back between 4,800 years and 3,700 years.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: ancient Neanderthal and human genomes, and more.

Several studies describe a new Neanderthal genome, Neanderthal sequence effects on human traits, and ancient hunter-gatherer population social structure clues.

Ancient Wanderlust

The movements of women likely spread culture and ideas during the Stone and Bronze Ages, the International Business Times reports.

Pages

In a survey, about half of Canadian government scientists say they still feel as though they cannot speak freely, ScienceInsider reports.

The Atlantic reports that biohacker Josiah Zayner regrets injecting himself with the CRISPR gene-editing tool on stage.

Clinicians in China are moving ahead with a number of CRISPR trials, NPR reports, as the US embarks on its first.

In Nature this week: genomic approaches applied to study Neolithic and Bronze Age Europeans, and more.