Max Planck

The researchers estimated that the newly sequenced late Neanderthals likely split from the lineage leading to much older Altai Neanderthal roughly 150,000 years ago.

By sequencing a handful of individuals who lived in Morocco some 13,900 to 15,100 years ago, investigators found clues to past population mergers in North Africa.

Sequence data for ancient and modern individuals in Remote Oceania and beyond suggests early populations were replaced without corresponding language changes.

A Max Planck-led team sequenced three dozen ancient humans found in the Baltic to unravel the region's population history.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: genomes of two organisms that regenerate body parts, sea lamprey genome, and more.

Researchers hope the genomes of the Mexican axolotl and the Schmidtea mediterranea worms will facilitate further studies on the processes behind regeneration. 

At PAG, researchers from the Rockefeller University Vertebrate Genome Laboratory outlined sequencing and assembly strategies for phase 1 of the VGP G10K.

Max Planck researchers screened metagenomic data from samples from an outbreak-era Mexican cemetery to find Salmonella enterica DNA.

A mitochondrial genome- and Y chromosome marker-based analysis suggests the Chachapoyas population was not completely replaced by Incas as previously believed.

Max Planck researchers reconstructed the genomes of six Yersinia pestis samples that date back between 4,800 years and 3,700 years.

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Researchers have treated an X-linked genetic disease affecting three babies in utero, Stat News reports.

The Associated Press reports that the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is beefing up sequencing as a tool to investigate foodborne illnesses.

Researchers have sequenced samples from ancient toilets to study past eating habits and health, NPR reports.

In Nature this week: ash dieback disease fungal genome, and more.