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Max Planck

Speakers during a session on research rigor and reproducibility said that cores could help push researchers to adopt practices that improve reproducibility.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: genetic analysis of Anatolian farmers, cotton genome analysis, and more.

The researchers found evidence of genetic continuity in Anatolia, even as the subsistence strategy changed from hunting and gathering to farming.

Two ancient DNA studies published today examined admixture and genetic changes among Iberian populations, starting from the Paleolithic Era.

Eighteen researchers call for a temporary stop to all clinical uses of human germline editing in a piece appearing in Nature.

LilBub, Sequenced

A famous Internet cat has had its genome sequenced to home in on two variants that may account for its appearance.

Researchers sequenced 45 individuals from the Caucasus and steppe region between 3,500 and 6,500 years ago, teasing out distinct populations and shared relationships.

In a new policy paper, investigators outlined existing challenges to public data sharing and touted the benefits of increasing openness before and after publication.

Researchers traced genomic, epigenomic, and expression features in lung carcinoma in situ cases that regressed or progressed to invasive lung squamous cell carcinomas.

The researchers found that low-frequency variants in TP53 had a large effect on head circumference and volume, suggesting a previously unknown role for the gene.

Pages

Bloomberg reports that the DNA-for-cash deal reported in Kentucky might be a more widespread scam.

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have treated infants with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency using gene therapy in an early phase study.

St. Louis Public Radio reports that some African Americans are turning to DNA ancestry testing to help guide genealogical searches.

In Nature this week: a genomic analysis of the snailfish Pseudoliparis swirei, ancient DNA analysis gives insight into the introduction of farming to England, and more.