Max Planck | GenomeWeb

Max Planck

Analysis of a gene associated with basal progenitor cell expansions in the brain suggests a single splice site change led to human-specific forms of the gene transcript.

The researchers said the bones likely belonged to individuals who were among the latest Neanderthals in Western Europe.

Using a sixth century sample from Germany, researchers reconstructed a high-coverage genome sequence for the Yersinia pestis strain involved in the Justinian plague. 

Barley field in Lancaster County, Penn.

An international team of researchers sequenced 6,000-year-old barley grains from the Judean Desert.

Arnold Böcklin: The Plague (1898)

Max Planck researchers traced the plague from the Mediterranean to Northern Europe, Russia, and China.

The transient transcriptome sequencing protocol relies on combining sequencing with 4-thiouridine labeling and RNA fragmentation.

The Wellcome Trust, the Max Planck Society, and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute will continue to support the open-access journal eLife, according to Nature News.

On the Go

The New York Times writes that the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology's Emmanuelle Charpentier has always been on the move, though now it's more about CRISPR.

The study from Emmanuelle Charpentier's lab shows that Cpf1 processes its own guide RNAs, and is the simplest CRISPR system yet to be discovered.

By scouring the genomes of more than 1,500 individuals from diverse populations, researchers mapped human genome sites enriched or depleted for archaic sequences.

Pages

In Science this week: genetic analysis of pollutant-tolerant fish, and more.

Researchers have found a rare carbapenem resistance gene on a US pig farm, NBC News reports.

New York officials are considering the use of a familial DNA search to get a lead on a suspect in the strangulation death of a runner.

NIH Director Francis Collins has selected a retired Army major general and cardiologist for the CEO spot at the agency's embattled Clinical Center.