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In PNAS this week: mouse model of genetically induced emphysema, gene expression signatures of circulating melanoma cells, and more.

An analysis of metagenomic sequences from donor and recipient stool samples highlighted bacterial abundance, phylogeny, and strain features influencing engraftment.

The polygenic score snags a greater percentage of people at risk of early heart attack than current tests that rely on single-gene variants or blood chemistry.

The Danish informatics firm is exploring analytical tools for its InWeb_InBioMap network, which currently contains more than 700,000 protein-protein interactions. 

The funding will be used to support the the newly established ME/CFS Collaborative Research Center at Stanford University.

The creator of the Genome Aggregation Database sees an ever-expanding GnomAD database as a centerpiece to improving the diagnosis of rare diseases.

Using RNA sequences for thousands of cells, researchers looked at head and neck squamous cell carcinomas and proposed streamlined expression subtypes.

Researchers are now using the approach to allow genome-wide sequencing to monitor disease and to investigate treatment response and resistance without the need for tissue biopsy.

'Now the Hard Work'

Business Insider reports that researchers are making headway in linking genetic variants to mental illness risk.

Alterations affecting the antigen presentation-related gene B2M appeared to be over-represented in melanomas with checkpoint blockade non-response or resistance.

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In Nature this week: genetic "clock" that can predict the lifespans of vertebrates, new assembler called wtdbg2, and more.

In a cartoon, Vox explores the lack of women among this year's winners of the Nobel Prize.

Science reports a new US defense bill would establish two groups aimed at combating foreign influence on research. 

Nature Biotechnology discusses promising early results from two clinical trials of CRISPR-based therapy for β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease.