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This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: mouse model of genetically induced emphysema, gene expression signatures of circulating melanoma cells, and more.

An analysis of metagenomic sequences from donor and recipient stool samples highlighted bacterial abundance, phylogeny, and strain features influencing engraftment.

The Danish informatics firm is exploring analytical tools for its InWeb_InBioMap network, which currently contains more than 700,000 protein-protein interactions. 

The funding will be used to support the the newly established ME/CFS Collaborative Research Center at Stanford University.

The creator of the Genome Aggregation Database sees an ever-expanding GnomAD database as a centerpiece to improving the diagnosis of rare diseases.

Using RNA sequences for thousands of cells, researchers looked at head and neck squamous cell carcinomas and proposed streamlined expression subtypes.

Researchers are now using the approach to allow genome-wide sequencing to monitor disease and to investigate treatment response and resistance without the need for tissue biopsy.

'Now the Hard Work'

Business Insider reports that researchers are making headway in linking genetic variants to mental illness risk.

Alterations affecting the antigen presentation-related gene B2M appeared to be over-represented in melanomas with checkpoint blockade non-response or resistance.

The initiative's four research projects will use use genetic and other technologies to detect and treat cancer at its earliest stages.

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A new study in JAMA finds that genetic tests might not be able to determine what diet is right for someone seeking to lose weight.

A genome-wide association study that linked common genetic variants to salivary gland carcinoma risk has been retracted, according to Retraction Watch.

Vampire bats' ability to live off blood is etched in their genomes and gut microbiomes, the Scientist reports.

In Genome Biology this week: peopling of the Sahara, epigenetic reprogramming analysis of liverwort, and more.