KTH Royal Institute of Technology

A team of Swedish researchers has received $3.3 million to develop a new nanotechnology platform for detecting blood-borne markers in lung and breast cancer.

The study found eight potential protein biomarkers differentially expressed in elderly Alzheimer's disease patients, and researchers are planning an expanded study.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – A consortium of European research institutions and private partners will use €5.3 million ($7.4 million) in funding to develop a microfluidics-based lab-on-a-chip device to identify and measure the concentration of circulating tumor cells in blood, one of the partners,

Name: Peter Nilsson
Title: Platform Director, Affinity Proteomics, SciLifeLab, Stockholm

While many countries are cutting back on funding for life science research, Sweden is not one of them, as the Northern European country's Prime Minister Fredrik Reinfeldt this week confirmed that his government intends to invest $320 million in life sciences over the next four ye

As part of the deal, KTH will also serve as a reference site for Arrayjet, and the two organizations will work together on publications and technology development.

When most people think of the array market, they might think of the whole-genome genotyping chips sold by firms like Affymetrix and Illumina. But for providers of array slides, printers, and scanners, the market increasingly is in protein chips, and business is good.

BioSilta said that the use of EnBase Flo will increase the efficiency of the secondary screening process by allowing the KTH researchers to scale down from a shake-flask culture format to a 96-well microtiter plate format.

The university is using the company’s EnBase technology in its proteomics studies.

The US Food and Drug Administration has new guidelines that enable some gene and cell therapies to undergo expedited review, according to the New York Times.

Using gene drives to control invasive species might be too risky, an initial advocate of the approach says.

In Science this week: intellectual property experts argue patent battles such as the one over CRISPR are wasteful, and more.

Researchers have grown tumors in 3D cell cultures to better understand cancer, the Economist reports.