Karolinska Institute

The funding is being provided to a number of early-career investigators and collaborative research groups using genomics and other technologies.

Investigators showed that sequencing cell-free DNA could detect microsatellite instability, structural rearrangements, and clonal hematopoiesis in patients with metastatic disease.

Using single-cell RNA sequencing and lineage tracing in a mouse model, researchers followed skin stem cell expression patterns in response to skin injury.

Researchers provided genetic diagnoses for about 68 percent of their primary antibody deficiency cohort, which altered clinical management in about half of them.

Risk With the Fix?

Two research teams warn that CRISPR-based gene editing could boost cancer risk by affecting p53 function, according to Stat News.

The study found that resistant clones in triple-negative breast tumors existed prior to chemo, but transcriptional changes happened in response to therapy.

CEO Anders Rylander said the company will initially market its DiviTum assay for breast cancer cases, though it could be used to monitor cell proliferation in all cancer types.

Researchers have increased their estimate of the heritability of ASD to 83 percent based on a reanalysis of their prior study of Swedish families.

The company plans to outlicense the assay, developed using a custom Affymetrix microarray, to an interested partner.

Investigators intend to genotype the biorepository using Illumina arrays with the aim of identifying markers that can be used to inform treatment and prevention efforts.

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The data generated by 100,000 Genomes Project is being housed on military servers due to attacks by hackers, Naked Security reports.

A new poll finds most US adults are not familiar with personalized medicine, according to HealthDay.

Vox reports that the United Nations' Convention on Biological Diversity decided against a gene drive moratorium.

In Science this week: sequencing of neuroblastomas uncovers alterations linked to prognosis, and more.