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Wealth in the Genes?

A trio of economists writes that, even after controlling for socio-economic factors, there's a relationship between genes and wealth, Fortune reports.

Two research groups reported on statistical methods for uncovering methylated cytosine and/or adenine bases using electrical current cues from Oxford Nanopore sequencers.

The researchers believe that by monitoring mtDNA copy number in blood, they will be able to identify people at risk for developing CHD who could benefit from preventative efforts.

A member of Henrietta Lacks says he is seeking compensation from Johns Hopkins University and will be filing a lawsuit, according to the Baltimore Sun.

The funding will, in part, support efforts to expand the project's catalog of functional elements and understand their roles in different contexts.

In Genome Research this week: American alligator genome assembly, microbiome of premature infants, and more.

Preliminary results from the NASA Twins Study indicate changes in DNA methylation and gene expression due to life in space, Nature News says.

A subset of mutation-associated neoantigens appeared to be lost from lung or head and neck tumors that became resistant to anti-PD1 or anti-PD1 and anti-CLTA4 therapy.

A Johns Hopkins University team developed a framework to evaluate approaches to predicting cancer driver genes.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: transcriptional control enables malaria parasite to get around disease control efforts, DNA methylation patterns in the Norway spruce, and more.

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The American Prospect writes that the pilot program to test the DNA of migrants could lead to more family separations.

An international commission is to develop a report on how researchers, clinicians, and regulators should evaluate the clinical applications of human germline genome editing.

The US Department of Agriculture presents a new blueprint for animal genomic research.

In Genome Research this week: repetitive element deletion linked to altered methylation and more in form of muscular dystrophy; human contamination in draft bacterial and archaeal genomes; and more.