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In Genome Research this week: sequencing method examines proteins parasite uses to evade immune system, L1 insertions in cancer, and more.

The work is being funded with $26.5 million from the 21st Century Cures Cancer Moonshot Initiative.

An RNA test in development that confirms whether a patient has HCV within 40 minutes could enable diagnosis and prescribing treatment during a single office visit.

Johns Hopkins University's Steven Salzberg and his colleagues have come up with a new estimate for the number of human genes, Nature News reports.

New tumor profiling papers stemming from prior clinical trials led to informative mutations in early-stage, ER+/HER2- breast cancer and lung squamous cell carcinoma.

Metagenomics can help researchers and clinicians uncover sources of infectious disease and discern whether pathogens are resistant to antimicrobials.

Go Small or Go Big?

The Wall Street Journal reports that some researchers are pinning their hopes to small, targeted clinical trials, while others argue large trials are still needed.

Researchers found that functional assays could improve the classification of cystic fibrosis-related missense variants with variable disease expressivity.

A panel at the Biology of Genomes meeting discussed the ethical, legal, and social ramifications of germline gene editing.

BGI will study pancreatic cancer with a group at Johns Hopkins and develop a diagnostic test for preterm birth detection with Mount Sinai Hospital researchers.  

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Public health experts call for a transparent COVID-19 vaccine approval process in a letter; the Food and Drug Administration commissioner assures science-based approval.

The Verge reports that new gene-naming guidelines aim in part to avoid Excel-related name change confusion.

In Nature this week: tuatara genome sequence aids in understanding amniote evolution, and more.

According to the Guardian, UK virologists say in a letter to officials that their expertise has been pushed aside in COVID-19 response plans.