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Johns Hopkins

Partnering with researchers at McGill University, the Johns Hopkins team that developed the method has now demonstrated its power in a much larger group of patients.

The assay correlates shortened telomere lengths in patients of different ages to potential risks for inherited diseases, such as bone marrow failure syndrome and liver cancer.

Broader View

At Nature, Johns Hopkins' Gundula Bosch describes her graduate program that aims to get doctoral students thinking about the big picture.

The proposed diagnostic platform will be able to identify and determine resistance of bloodstream infections within three hours.

Bacteria In Cahoots

Two bacterial species together help feed the development of colon cancer, according to the New York Times.

A study led by Johns Hopkins describes a method for automating slow, inaccurate manual chart review when searching for signs of misdiagnosis.

The multi-analyte assay could screen for cancers that currently lack early-stage detection methods, including ovarian, liver, stomach, pancreatic, and esophageal cancers.

Hope, But...

The promise of precision medicine isn't yet a reality for many cancer patients, NPR reports.

The team found that telomere fusions in pancreatic cells can act as potential predictive biomarkers for invasive cancer and high grade dysplasia in patients.

The company has been working for several years under NIH grants totaling more than $7 million and is now preparing for its first formal product launch.

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A UK woman is suing three National Health Service Trusts for not telling her about her father's Huntington's disease diagnosis, the BBC reports.

LiveScience reports that a novel mutation in the LPL gene was uncovered in three siblings with very high triglyceride levels.

The president of Nankai University is embroiled in a data manipulation scandal, the South China Morning Post reports.

In PNAS this week: cytotoxic CD4 T cell signature in supercentenarians, evolutionary history of beetles, and more.