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A study presented at the National Society of Genetic Counselors annual meeting last week analyzed how counseling sessions affected patients on five measures.

The projects are organized by the Eliminate Cancer Initiative, the National Brain Tumor Society, and the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation.

The institutions will develop a cloud-based storage and compute infrastructure for unrestricted and controlled-access data and metadata from NHGRI's projects.

A pair of economists uses genetic attainment scores to examine the effect of parental income on the success of their children.

Researchers gave a handful of octopuses MDMA to find that they too act more social on the drug, Gizmodo reports.

The tool, called Cerebro, significantly outperformed other publicly available methods, including in the less-trafficked areas of the genome that are now relevant for TMB immunotherapy prediction.

Testing Less Likely

Women with breast or ovarian cancer living in medically underserved regions of the US are less likely to get recommended BRCA1 or BRCA2 genetic testing, according to a new study.

In PLOS this week: genetic architecture mediating gene expression, metabolomic patterns in multiple myeloma, and more.

The FDA granted the assay's status based on its ability to detect both ovarian and pancreatic cancer in asymptomatic individuals over the age of 65.

In Science this week: genetic study of Homo floresiensis, approach for counting immune cells based on DNA signatures, and more.

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Public health experts call for a transparent COVID-19 vaccine approval process in a letter; the Food and Drug Administration commissioner assures science-based approval.

The Verge reports that new gene-naming guidelines aim in part to avoid Excel-related name change confusion.

In Nature this week: tuatara genome sequence aids in understanding amniote evolution, and more.

According to the Guardian, UK virologists say in a letter to officials that their expertise has been pushed aside in COVID-19 response plans.