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Never smokers make up an increasing portion of lung cancer patients, and researchers are working to tease out their genetic and environmental risk.

In Nature this week: Integrative Human Microbiome Project researchers investigate host-microbiome relationship in health and disease, and more.

The company is commercializing a method developed by researchers at Johns Hopkins that detects cancer with high specificity from a blood sample.

The company received support from a Johns Hopkins University center focused on point-of-care device development for sexually transmitted infections.

In Genome Research this week: repetitive element deletion linked to altered methylation and more in form of muscular dystrophy; human contamination in draft bacterial and archaeal genomes; and more.

In PNAS this week: Cdx2 cells can help regenerate heart tissue in mice following a heart attack, PIWI-interacting small RNA levels in human cancer, and more.

The assay examine phenotypic behaviors of isolated cancer cells from biopsies at initial diagnosis.

Two new studies of stage I to III CRC suggest that the presence of ctDNA in the months after surgery or chemotherapy can help identify patients who go on to relapse.

The researchers reported that most of these changes, though not all, reverted to normal upon the astronaut's return to Earth.

Common non-coding variants, along with rarer coding alterations, appear to contribute to a developmental disease with bowel and other gastrointestinal symptoms.

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As the Canadian election season heats up, neither major party has really paid much attention to science, according to Nature News.

BBC News says the uncertainty over Brexit is affecting science funding in the UK.

A new app purports to tell users "how gay" they are by looking at their DNA, but experts tell Futurism that the app is bunk.

In Nature this week: human and great ape cerebral organoids reveal aspects of brain development unique to humans, and more.