JGI

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: red algae Porphyra umbicalis genome, deep neural network model for sequencing peptides, and more.

The researchers have published more than a thousand reference genomes that fill phylogenetic gaps in the tree of life.

Nigel Mouncey joined the JGI in March from Dow AgroSciences and is interested in broadening the user base and scope of JGI's research. 

Giant viruses may have developed from smaller viruses while also vacuuming up host genes, according to Ars Technica.

Fragilariopsis cylindrus

A quarter of the polar alga genome harbors highly divergent alleles, an international research team reported.

Researchers took two complementary approaches to assemble the Xenopus laevis genome — whole-genome and long-insert clone-based end sequencing.

A Joint Genome Institute team of researchers uncovered evidence of some 125,000 viruses from within 5 terabases of metagenomic data.

Researchers at the Joint Genome Institute and elsewhere have been working on understanding the genomes of switchgrass and a close relative in order to use the plants to make better biofuels.

A Joint Genome Institute team worked with Pacific Biosciences to create high-resolution phylogenetic profiles of microbial communities from environmental DNA.

A candidate phylum called Candidatus Kryptonia was first detected from a metagenomic sequence database and subsequently studied in more detail.

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The US Food and Drug Administration has new guidelines that enable some gene and cell therapies to undergo expedited review, according to the New York Times.

Using gene drives to control invasive species might be too risky, an initial advocate of the approach says.

In Science this week: intellectual property experts argue patent battles such as the one over CRISPR are wasteful, and more.

Researchers have grown tumors in 3D cell cultures to better understand cancer, the Economist reports.