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iSAEC

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The International Serious Adverse Events Consortium has finished enrolling two studies investigating genetic markers linked to drug-induced liver injury and hypersensitivity reactions, and it has launched a new study focused on finding markers of treatment-related inf

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The International Serious Adverse Events Consortium today said that it will collaborate with scientists at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and UC San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy on research into the genetics behind drug-induced renal inju

The International Severe Adverse Event Consortium will collaborate with CHI's Center for Translational Research to identify genetic markers for adverse drug reactions.

The iSAEC this week announced a partnership with Shanghai Jaio Tong University to study serious drug reactions in Chinese populations, expanding the group's understanding of the impact of ethnic diversity on genomically influenced adverse events with a strong immunological underpinning.

The goal of the partnership is to increase knowledge of the impact of ethnic diversity on the genetics of drug-induced serious adverse events.

The partners will work together to boost the number of subjects being studied who have adverse genetic reactions to two TB drugs.

Nine members of the HMO Research Network "will use detailed clinical profiles to search for potential subjects to enroll into … serious adverse events research projects using their electronic medical record databases," iSAEC said in a statement.

In order to more comprehensively analyze genetic variants associated with adverse reactions to drugs, the SAEC launched two pilot projects to explore exome sequencing earlier this year, and is currently organizing a third.

The new partners include the University of Liverpool, Newcastle University, the HMO Research Network, and Cerner.

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