Intermountain Healthcare

Researchers can apply to receive $100,000 in matched funds from Intermountain to cover project costs related to high-throughput genomic sequencing.

The partnership has allowed Philips to provide a single view of cancer patient's status, including genomic test results, through the FDA-cleared IntelliSite Pathology Solution.

 

The health system hopes to pair the data with nearly three decades worth of electronic health records as well as medical histories provided by contributors.

Following several Sync for Genes pilots, FHIR Genomics advocates are pushing for adoption of their standard to make omics data compatible with EHRs.

Results from a randomized clinical trial known as GIFT suggest that genotype-guided warfarin dosing is linked to fewer adverse events than clinical dosing.

The company launched the RxMatch Antidepressant Panel as the first step to grow beyond precision oncology and offer genomic assays for a wider range of diseases.

The researchers now plan to apply the linked-read technology to additional cancer samples as well as other disease cohorts with suspected structural variants.

Navican Raises $15M

The Intermountain spinout will use the Series A financing to commercialize and expand its precision cancer care offering, including the TheraMap solution. 

Philips has teamed with Illumina and Intermountain Healthcare's Navican on informatics for precision medicine and signed a genome analytics deal with Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

The leaner panel, an option for patients who lack sufficient tissue samples for more comprehensive profiling, has helped reduce test rejection rates by 80 percent.

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Lawmakers have asked four direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies to explain their privacy policies and security measures, according to Stat News.

The Trump Administration has proposed a plan to reorganize the federal government, the Washington Post reports.

In Science this week: genetic overlap among many psychiatric disorders, and more.

The Economist writes that an increasing number of scientific journals don't do peer review.