Institut Pasteur

By sequencing Vibrio cholerae isolates from Africa and Latin America, investigators got a look at the lineages leading to outbreaks over several decades.

An Institut Pasteur-led team genotyped various Pakistani populations to reconstruct the genetic history of descendants of the Indian Ocean slave trade.

With hundreds of bacterial genome sequences, researchers characterized horizontal gene transfer hotspots contributing to genome evolution and diversification.

Investigators used gene expression and immunological profiling to detect distinct immune responses in dengue virus-infected children with or without symptoms.

Using data for thousands of African individuals, researchers retraced migrations by Bantu language groups and ties to other populations in Africa and beyond.

International research teams collaborated to create five fully functioning synthetic yeast chromosomes, taking them one step closer to a whole synthetic genome.

By analyzing hundreds of rabies virus genomes from isolates collected over 65 years, researchers characterized evolutionary features in two main RABV groups.

Two independent research teams linked plasmepsin 2 and plasmepsin 3 gene amplifications to piperaquine resistance.

The next-generation sequencing-based test is designed to detect bacteria and viruses in blood samples from patients with suspected infections, especially immunocompromised patients.

By sequencing the genomes of more than 300 Shigella dysenteriae isolates, researchers identified lineages involved in worldwide outbreaks prior to WWI.

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The US Food and Drug Administration has new guidelines that enable some gene and cell therapies to undergo expedited review, according to the New York Times.

Using gene drives to control invasive species might be too risky, an initial advocate of the approach says.

In Science this week: intellectual property experts argue patent battles such as the one over CRISPR are wasteful, and more.

Researchers have grown tumors in 3D cell cultures to better understand cancer, the Economist reports.