Indiana University

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: computational approach to bring together single-cell data, systems genetic analysis of Anopheles gambiae polymorphism, and more.

The New York Times looks into medical research funding in the US and how the grant system might not be funding the best work.

Two studies appearing in JAMA Neurology respectively examined how variants linked to Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease contribute to the conditions.

To "Stifle Science"

Lawsuits are being used to intimidate some scientists, writes one researcher at the New York Times.

LifeOmic, founded less than a year ago, expects omic data sets to become as clinically relevant as diagnostic medical imaging.

With its inaugural informatics director set to begin next month, the year-old IU Precision Health Initiative should begin its research work this fall.

Changes Required

A culture change is needed to make science more reproducible, says Indiana's Aaron Carroll at the New York Times.

A chromosome 15 variant may have ties to congenital heart failure in breast cancer patients who receive treatment with the anthracycline chemotherapy doxorubicin.

Indiana University researchers said that insights into this mechanism could lead to finding treatment targets for both diseases.

The method works by adding noise to database search results to confound algorithms that try to access private details about contributing individuals.

Pages

Cancer researcher Alan Rabson has died at 92, the New York Times reports.

As the National Guideline Clearinghouse goes dark, the ECRI Institute says it will pick up the slack.

In Genome Research this week: sequencing method examines proteins parasite uses to evade immune system, L1 insertions in cancer, and more.

The Atlantic reports on private Facebook support groups for people who receive unexpected parentage results from direct-to-consumer genetic tests.