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A genome sequencing study in Nature offered hints about genetic strategies organisms may use to maintain species diversity, even in the absence of sexual repr

Skincare company GeneOnyx last week debuted an over-the-counter genetic analysis test for personalized skincare based on rapid DNA and RNA detection technology developed by partner DNA Electronics.

Researchers in the UK have compared a PCR-based and a capture hybridization-based assay for sequencing panels of inherited cardiovascular disease genes and have found both to be suitable for diagnostics in principle, though their sensitivity needs to be optimized.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The UK's Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council today announced a £5 million ($7.9 million) five-year grant to a consortium of universities to develop a Web-based synthetic biology platform.

The group's core areas of interest are in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, leukemias, and infectious diseases, and in particular, familial hypercholesterolemia and cardiac arrhythmia.

The new partners will each contribute £40 million in the UK Centre for Medical Research and Innovation, bringing the total committed funding for the planned London institute to £700 million ($1.14 billion).

The group from Imperial College London's Hammersmith Hospital has developed a duplex qPCR assay that measures both BCR-ABL1 target and endogenous control transcripts in the same reaction with no loss of sensitivity compared to a previously used simplex test.

The lab will study how metabolic data can be used in the operating room at St. Mary's Hospital.

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CBS This Morning highlights recent Medicare fraud involving offers of genetic testing.

Researchers find that many cancer drugs in development don't work quite how their developers thought they did, as Discover's D-brief blog reports.

Mariya Gabriel, a Bulgarian politician, is to be the next European Union research commissioner, according to Science.

In Science this week: a survey indicates that US adults are more likely to support the agricultural use of gene drives if they target non-native species and if they are limited, and more.