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Jess Wade, a postdoc at Imperial College London, hopes to raise the profiles of women in science by writing their Wikipedia pages, the Guardian reports.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: single-cell analysis of blood cells from malaria mosquito vector, genes contributing to high yield in rice, and more.

An international research team uncovered differences in both host and parasite gene expression between uncomplicated and severe malaria cases in The Gambia.

The Economist reports that new labs aim to centralize genetic engineering lab work.

The company is collaborating with two UK institutes to assess whether its Signatera ctDNA technology can detect disease recurrence in women treated for breast cancer.

A number of these loci were linked to blood pressure medication targets, and the researchers developed a genetic risk score.

Imperial College London researchers are working on gene drives for mosquitos to fight malaria, NPR reports.

By overlaying epilepsy genetic data onto co-expressed gene networks from post-mortem brain samples, researchers proposed a 320-gene expression network for epilepsy.

The DNA foundries have been funded through an £18 million ($23.5 million) investment from the BBSRC and should all be fully operational by next year.

Using absolute and relative gene expression analyses, researchers identified expression patterns associated with preeclampsia in dozens of placental tissue samples.

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Mainichi reports that 43 percent of Japanese individuals said they did not want to eat agricultural products that had been modified using gene-editing tools.

Two US Department of Agriculture research departments are moving to the Kansas City area, according to the Washington Post.

Slate's Jane Hu compares some at-home genetic tests to astrology.

In PLOS this week: analysis of polygenic risk scores for skin cancer, chronic pain GWAS, and more.