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Imperial College London

Reuters reports that UK researchers are using gene-editing tools to develop flu-resistant chickens.

The UK developers believe that their device has the potential for multiplex testing at the point of care using solid-state nanopore sensing with DNA probes.

With genome-wide association studies involving more than 200,000 individuals, researchers narrowed in on 58 loci and dozens of genes with ties to a chronic infection marker.

In Nature this week: common genetic variants influence monogenic neurodevelopmental disorders,  analysis of fruitENCODE, and more.

An Imperial College London-led team reports that it was able to use a gene drive to control a population of lab mosquitos.

In PNAS this week: analysis of proteolytic enzymes secreted by circulating tumor cells, phylogenetic study of Fv1 evolution, and more.

Stop It There

Researchers in the UK are working on using gene drives to control malaria-carrying mosquitoes, the Telegraph reports.

One Page at a Time

Jess Wade, a postdoc at Imperial College London, hopes to raise the profiles of women in science by writing their Wikipedia pages, the Guardian reports.

In PNAS this week: single-cell analysis of blood cells from malaria mosquito vector, genes contributing to high yield in rice, and more.

An international research team uncovered differences in both host and parasite gene expression between uncomplicated and severe malaria cases in The Gambia.

Pages

The New York City Police Department will be removing DNA profiles from a local database if they are from people who were never convicted of a crime, the New York Times reports.

Science reports that accusations of sexual assault against a microbiome researcher has also led to questions about his academic certifications.

Wired reports that researchers are analyzing the DNA fish leave behind in water to study their populations.

In Science this week: comprehensive cellular map of the human thymus, evidence of admixture between the ancestors of Neanderthals and Denisovan and a 'superarchaic' population.