Imperial College London

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: analysis of proteolytic enzymes secreted by circulating tumor cells, phylogenetic study of Fv1 evolution, and more.

Stop It There

Researchers in the UK are working on using gene drives to control malaria-carrying mosquitoes, the Telegraph reports.

One Page at a Time

Jess Wade, a postdoc at Imperial College London, hopes to raise the profiles of women in science by writing their Wikipedia pages, the Guardian reports.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: single-cell analysis of blood cells from malaria mosquito vector, genes contributing to high yield in rice, and more.

An international research team uncovered differences in both host and parasite gene expression between uncomplicated and severe malaria cases in The Gambia.

The Economist reports that new labs aim to centralize genetic engineering lab work.

The company is collaborating with two UK institutes to assess whether its Signatera ctDNA technology can detect disease recurrence in women treated for breast cancer.

A number of these loci were linked to blood pressure medication targets, and the researchers developed a genetic risk score.

Imperial College London researchers are working on gene drives for mosquitos to fight malaria, NPR reports.

By overlaying epilepsy genetic data onto co-expressed gene networks from post-mortem brain samples, researchers proposed a 320-gene expression network for epilepsy.

Pages

The New York Times and ProPublica look into the close relationship between a startup and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

Yahoo News reports millions of dollars are being transferred from NIH, CDC, and other programs to pay for the housing of detained undocumented immigrant children.

In Science this week: in vitro generation of human reproductive cells, and more.

Researchers gave a handful of octopuses MDMA to find that they too act more social on the drug, Gizmodo reports.