ICSASG

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) — An international consortium announced today that it has sequenced the Atlantic salmon genome.

The RFP is "targeting large-scale sequencing centers or a consortium of academic and/or commercial centers that are believed to have the expertise and capacity to participate in a project of this scale."

Canada, Chile, and Norway are seeking a center to finish sequencing the Atlantic salmon genome.

Last year, the consortium, which involves researchers, funding agencies, and industry representatives from Canada, Chile, and Norway, awarded a $6 million contract to Beckman Coulter Genomics for the first phase of the project, which uses Sanger sequencing.

The ICSASG recommends Sanger sequencing or a technology of equivalent read length and quality, rather than one of the current next-generation sequencing technologies, for the first phase of the project. The second phase will likely involve novel sequencing technologies.

Using DNA to sketch crime victims might not be a great idea, the NYTimes says.

Science has its own problem with sexual harassment. What do we do with the research these abusers produce, Wired asks.

Senate Republicans led by Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) are trying to change how the government funds basic research, reports ScienceInsider.

In Science this week: combining genomics and ecology to better understand the effects of natural selection on evolution, and more.