ICSASG

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) — An international consortium announced today that it has sequenced the Atlantic salmon genome.

The RFP is "targeting large-scale sequencing centers or a consortium of academic and/or commercial centers that are believed to have the expertise and capacity to participate in a project of this scale."

Canada, Chile, and Norway are seeking a center to finish sequencing the Atlantic salmon genome.

Last year, the consortium, which involves researchers, funding agencies, and industry representatives from Canada, Chile, and Norway, awarded a $6 million contract to Beckman Coulter Genomics for the first phase of the project, which uses Sanger sequencing.

The ICSASG recommends Sanger sequencing or a technology of equivalent read length and quality, rather than one of the current next-generation sequencing technologies, for the first phase of the project. The second phase will likely involve novel sequencing technologies.

Sometimes genetic tests give inconclusive results and provide little reassurance to patients, the Associated Press reports.

Vox wonders whether gene-editing crops will be viewed similarly as genetically modified organisms of if people will give them a try.

In Science this week: research regulation and reporting requirement reform, and more.

With H3Africa, Charles Rotimi has been working to bolster the representation of African participants and African researchers in genomics, Newsweek reports.