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The 2010s saw major strides made through several large-scale initiatives aimed at mapping the human proteome and developing approaches for clinical work.

Gathering last week in Australia, the community continued its years-long push towards increased clinical relevance and integration with other omics disciplines.

The group's meeting this week evidenced the ongoing shift towards analyzing proteins in the context of specific isoforms, complexes, and cells.

The group has identified proteins from nearly 90 percent of the predicted protein-coding genes, though the remaining 10 percent present significant challenges.

Mirroring developments in the field more generally, the organization's annual meeting showed a move toward more applied research as well as multi-omic projects.

In a recent study, project researchers highlighted the need to use findings from outside proteomics as they chase down the remaining unidentified proteins.

Ruedi Aebersold

GenomeWeb spoke to Aebersold this week from New York to get his thoughts on the meeting and what is happening in the world of proteomics more generally.

Among the launches at the organization's annual meeting this week in Taipei were a personalized proteomics initiative and a new DIA mass spec method.

Writing in MCP, the researchers provided a survey of techniques for biologists interested in using multiplexed quantitative proteomics in their research.

The researchers will use the expressed proteins to refine and optimize multiple-reaction monitoring assays that they will then apply to actual biological samples.

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The Washington Post reports that Herbert Tabor, who worked at the US National Institutes of Health for 77 years, has died at 101.

The World Bank is seeking approval for a $12 billion plan to provide low-income nations with funds to procure SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, according to Reuters.

Science writes that public health officials and others are debating whether cycle threshold values should be included on SARS-CoV-2 results.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: online database of SARS-CoV-2 protein structures, atlas of the human brain, and more.