HUPO

The group has identified proteins from nearly 90 percent of the predicted protein-coding genes, though the remaining 10 percent present significant challenges.

Mirroring developments in the field more generally, the organization's annual meeting showed a move toward more applied research as well as multi-omic projects.

In a recent study, project researchers highlighted the need to use findings from outside proteomics as they chase down the remaining unidentified proteins.

Ruedi Aebersold

GenomeWeb spoke to Aebersold this week from New York to get his thoughts on the meeting and what is happening in the world of proteomics more generally.

Among the launches at the organization's annual meeting this week in Taipei were a personalized proteomics initiative and a new DIA mass spec method.

Writing in MCP, the researchers provided a survey of techniques for biologists interested in using multiplexed quantitative proteomics in their research.

The researchers will use the expressed proteins to refine and optimize multiple-reaction monitoring assays that they will then apply to actual biological samples.

The group has yet to characterize 2,948 proteins out of a total of 20,055 protein-coding genes in the human proteome.

From research collaborations to corporate acquisitions, attention from the broader scientific community highlighted the field's capabilities and limitations.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – A team led by researchers from the Human Proteome Organization's Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project has completed a study using data from the National Human Genome Research Institute's Encyclopedia of DNA Elements Consortium (ENCODE) to aid in identification of previ

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With H3Africa, Charles Rotimi has been working to bolster the representation of African participants and African researchers in genomics, Newsweek reports.

NPR reports that government and private insurers are being slow to cover recently approved CAR-T cell therapies.

CNBC reports that there are thousands of genetic tests available for consumers to chose between.

In Nature this week: genomic analysis of ducks, whole-genome doubling among tumor samples, and more.