HUPO

The group's meeting this week evidenced the ongoing shift towards analyzing proteins in the context of specific isoforms, complexes, and cells.

The group has identified proteins from nearly 90 percent of the predicted protein-coding genes, though the remaining 10 percent present significant challenges.

Mirroring developments in the field more generally, the organization's annual meeting showed a move toward more applied research as well as multi-omic projects.

In a recent study, project researchers highlighted the need to use findings from outside proteomics as they chase down the remaining unidentified proteins.

Ruedi Aebersold

GenomeWeb spoke to Aebersold this week from New York to get his thoughts on the meeting and what is happening in the world of proteomics more generally.

Among the launches at the organization's annual meeting this week in Taipei were a personalized proteomics initiative and a new DIA mass spec method.

Writing in MCP, the researchers provided a survey of techniques for biologists interested in using multiplexed quantitative proteomics in their research.

The researchers will use the expressed proteins to refine and optimize multiple-reaction monitoring assays that they will then apply to actual biological samples.

The group has yet to characterize 2,948 proteins out of a total of 20,055 protein-coding genes in the human proteome.

From research collaborations to corporate acquisitions, attention from the broader scientific community highlighted the field's capabilities and limitations.

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A genome-wide association study highlights a potential role for hair follicles in acne risk, according to New Scientist.

Newsday reports that breast cancer genetic testing guidelines for are out of date and may miss individuals.

In Cell this week: gene editing-based strategy to screen for immune system regulators, ancient plague patterns, and more.

Publication of He Jiankui's work on gene-edited infants would raise ethical concerns for journals, Wired and others report.