HUPO

The group has identified proteins from nearly 90 percent of the predicted protein-coding genes, though the remaining 10 percent present significant challenges.

Mirroring developments in the field more generally, the organization's annual meeting showed a move toward more applied research as well as multi-omic projects.

In a recent study, project researchers highlighted the need to use findings from outside proteomics as they chase down the remaining unidentified proteins.

Ruedi Aebersold

GenomeWeb spoke to Aebersold this week from New York to get his thoughts on the meeting and what is happening in the world of proteomics more generally.

Among the launches at the organization's annual meeting this week in Taipei were a personalized proteomics initiative and a new DIA mass spec method.

Writing in MCP, the researchers provided a survey of techniques for biologists interested in using multiplexed quantitative proteomics in their research.

The researchers will use the expressed proteins to refine and optimize multiple-reaction monitoring assays that they will then apply to actual biological samples.

The group has yet to characterize 2,948 proteins out of a total of 20,055 protein-coding genes in the human proteome.

From research collaborations to corporate acquisitions, attention from the broader scientific community highlighted the field's capabilities and limitations.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – A team led by researchers from the Human Proteome Organization's Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project has completed a study using data from the National Human Genome Research Institute's Encyclopedia of DNA Elements Consortium (ENCODE) to aid in identification of previ

Pages

In an against-all-odds twist, a researcher studying exceeding rare FOXG1 mutations discovers her daughter has the syndrome.

An effort by Genomics Medicine Ireland is creating a database of diseases based on the genomics of people in Ireland. It now is looking into the possibility of including Scotland in its work.

In recent weeks, the direct-to-consumer genetics firm has rolled out a health hub where customers can share information concerning 18 common health conditions.

In PLOS this week, new genes associated with prostate cancer risk, genetic patterns in M. bovis, and more.