Hospital for Sick Children

This Week in Cell

In Cell this week: sequencing to understand medulloblastoma metastases, genome and transcriptome implicates TAP1 in X-linked Dystonia-Parkinsonism, and more.

Personal Genome Project Canada reports its first wave of data, which includes some unexpected findings, the Globe and Mail writes.

Genome Canada and its partners recently funded two new initiatives with C$255 that will back precision medicine, genomics, and technology development.

The funding will support various projects and research centers that are advancing precision medicine and genomic technology development.

Standard Workup

Researchers say genetic testing should be part of diagnosing cerebral palsy, according to the Toronto Star.

The consortium is collecting data from different omics streams for a cohort of individuals with autism spectrum disorders with the long-term goal of improving treatment.

A multi-region analysis of medulloblastoma and other tumor types highlighted the dramatic somatic alteration differences that can crop up within a single tumor.

Speakers at the conference's opening plenary showed how their work in cancer research fit into the broad theme of 'Discover, Predict, Prevent, Treat.'

One team examined single-nucleotide variation, indels, and copy-number variations in ASD, while the other focused on large structural variations.

The researchers will use genomics to address challenges facing Canada's forestry, healthcare, agricultural, and aquacultural industries.


The London School of Economics' Daniele Fanelli argues at the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that the reproducibility crisis in science isn't as dire as some say.

A team of researchers in Portugal has examined the genomic basis for racing pigeons' athleticism and navigational skills, finding it's likely polygenic.

Wired reports that diagnostic firms continue to seek, post-Theranos, the ability to diagnose diseases from small amounts of blood.

In Science this week: analysis of DNA from ancient North Africans, and more.