Hospital for Sick Children | GenomeWeb

Hospital for Sick Children

One team examined single-nucleotide variation, indels, and copy-number variations in ASD, while the other focused on large structural variations.

The researchers will use genomics to address challenges facing Canada's forestry, healthcare, agricultural, and aquacultural industries.

Researchers reported on the impact sequencing projects have already had on participants, as well as the challenges, particularly in data interpretation and storage.

The recommendations resulted from two meetings that brought together physicians, lab workers, researchers, genetic counselors, and patient families from the US and Canada.

Researchers have found that mutations present in medulloblastoma tumors at relapse differ substantially from those present at diagnosis.

Removing exon duplications is just one way in which the genome editing technology could be applied to treat hereditary genetic diseases.

Researchers found that array-based testing and exome sequencing contributed uniquely to ASD diagnosis, and that the diagnostic yield of testing was higher in complex autism cases.

BioTeam has developed a web portal for the MSSNG repository that offers easy access to genomic, phenotype, and clinical data collected through the project.

David Glazer from Google Genomics provided an update on the MSSNG project, a collaboration between Autism Speaks, The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, and Google.

The group is currently comparing a lab-developed nCounter assay to "gold-standard" RT-PCR assays to retrospectively analyze sarcoma patient samples.

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An opinion piece in the New York Times urges lawmakers to keep genetic protections in place.

Research funding in Canada is to remain mostly the same, ScienceInsider reports.

In Science this week: random DNA replication errors play role in cancer, and more.

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation embarks on an open-access publishing path.