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In Science this week: a new method for measuring genome-wide expression at a cellular resolution, and more.

Researchers focused in on strong candidate genes in schizophrenia with brain anatomy, brain activity, and behavioral screens on a large set of zebrafish mutants.

That's a Lot of Edits

Harvard Medical School's George Church and his colleagues report in a preprint that they made more than 13,000 genome edits to a single cell.

Speakers at this year's ABRF meeting described how they used single-cell tools in combination with other single-cell approaches and other methods.

Reprogrammable DNA

Wired reports that researchers have shown they could reprogram a DNA-based computer.

A draft genome for the three-banded panther worm served as the foundation to untangle regulatory and chromatin accessibility changes triggered during regeneration.

Two ancient DNA studies published today examined admixture and genetic changes among Iberian populations, starting from the Paleolithic Era.

Eighteen researchers call for a temporary stop to all clinical uses of human germline editing in a piece appearing in Nature.

Researchers brought together blood transcriptomic, metabolomic, proteomic, and immune cell profiles for dozens of West African and Australasian infants.

A number of the variants uncovered by an international research team appear to "tune" which hematopoietic cell lineage is produced.

Pages

The Wall Street Journal looks into FamilyTreeDNA's handling of genetic genealogy searches by law enforcement.

In a point-counterpoint in the Boston Globe, researchers discuss the potential of gene editing to prevent Lyme disease, but also the pitfalls of doing so.

MIT's Technology Review reports that researchers hope to develop a CRISPR-based pain therapy.

In Science this week: atlas of malaria parasites' gene expression across their life cycles, and more.