Harvard

Fix It Up

Harvard Medical School's George Church discusses editing human DNA, including germline DNA, in the New England Journal of Medicine.

For Long Life

A new sample of supercentenarian genomes is to be available to researchers this week, the New York Times reports.

Using Neolithic and Chalcolithic period samples, researchers explored farming and hunter-gatherer admixture in populations from Hungary, Spain, and Germany.

Participants in the pilot will begin developing the capabilities required for the planned data commons, including making data transparent and interoperable.

The consortium aims to identify tuberculosis protein targets and corresponding small molecule inhibitors that can be used to develop drugs to shorten therapy duration.

Alterations affecting the antigen presentation-related gene B2M appeared to be over-represented in melanomas with checkpoint blockade non-response or resistance.

The new institute, co-located with the China National GeneBank, will focus on synthetic biology technologies and applications. 

Caught It

The BabySeq project has uncovered a disease-causing mutation in a seemingly healthy baby, CBS News reports.

The NIH has awarded $169 million this year to support 110 new projects in the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies Initiative.

A Mammoth Competition

Labs in the US and South Korea are hoping to bring the woolly mammoth back from beyond extinction, Newsweek writes.

Pages

The US Food and Drug Administration has new guidelines that enable some gene and cell therapies to undergo expedited review, according to the New York Times.

Using gene drives to control invasive species might be too risky, an initial advocate of the approach says.

In Science this week: intellectual property experts argue patent battles such as the one over CRISPR are wasteful, and more.

Researchers have grown tumors in 3D cell cultures to better understand cancer, the Economist reports.