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Harvard

The study suggests that modern human populations split into an eastern and a western group some 45,000 years ago, not long after the main out-of-Africa migration.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: genetic variants linked to response to food ads, effects of MECP2 mutations in Rett syndrome, and more.

That Stinky Scent

A genome-wide association study in the BMJ homes in on variants that may make people unable to smell the 'asparagus urine' stench.

The licenses cover IP related to a new CRISPR technology known as Cpf1, advanced forms of Cas9, and additional Cas9-based genome editing technologies.

While Angelina Jolie's op-ed on her BRCA test prompted others to seek testing, many of the women who did had a lower pre-test probability of carrying a mutation, a new study says.

Using exome sequence and phenotyping data for individuals from longitudinal population studies, investigators began parsing pathogenic mutation effects in the genes.

A team of researchers from  Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School found that the two proteins appear to have opposing effects.

The startup, which was founded by Harvard's George Church, plans to commercialize a sequencing technology that is also able to map RNAs in 3D. 

Researchers are making mutations in a cell's genome to mark it and later read out that information to create cell lineage maps and chemical interaction histories.

By focusing on sequences that have diverged rapidly in humans, researchers identified regulatory sequences suspected of affecting neural processes.

Pages

The Wall Street Journal reports that National Institutes of Health Director Francis Collins' response to contamination concerns at the agency might have delayed care.

The final revision of the Common Rule doesn't include the proposed change requiring consent for leftover biospecimens.

The first Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology papers show mixed results.

In Nature this week: mobile phone-based targeted DNA sequencing, and more.