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This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: trait prediction algorithm, missense mutation linked to hearing loss, and more.

The startup aims to tap into the $60 billion probiotics industry by sequencing the microbiomes of athletes to identify bacteria that improve performance.

Variants in CETP-inhibitor and statin target genes helped investigators untangle complex ties between low-density lipoprotein levels and cardiovascular events.

Lessen the Chances

Even with a genetic predisposition toward obesity, the Washington Post notes there are steps people can take to lessen that risk.

Pig Organs to Humans?

Researchers have used CRISPR to develop piglets that lack retroviruses, paving the way to use pig organs in human transplantation, the New York Times reports.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: CRISPR/Cas9 used to correct a disease-causing mutation in embryos, and more.

The deal will enable sequencing startup Veritas to offer AI, machine learning, genome interpretation, and data sharing services.

With discovery and replication meta-analyses on data for more than 100,000 individuals, researchers identified variants that influence lean mass near five genes.

Persistent Gap

Researchers examine the gap in funding between researchers and research institutions, ScienceInsider reports

Using data from the UK Biobank, a Harvard Medical School-led team of researchers has uncovered 15 new loci associated with coronary artery disease.

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Sequencing could help combat foodborne illnesses, according to a blog post by Food and Drug Administration officials.

Popular Mechanics reports that Caltech researchers have built a prototype nanobot using DNA.

The Sacramento Bee writes that direct-to-consumer genetic testing connected a woman to sperm donor-conceived half siblings.

In PLOS this week: gene expression catalog for sheep, viral diversity among respiratory samples from camels, and more.