Georgia Tech

Five and Gone

CNBC reports that half of academic researchers leave after about five years.

In Genome Biology this week: study of selection in orangutan populations, eQTLs in developing human brain, and more.

A Georgia Tech team found that the reliance of genome-wide association studies on European populations has skewed estimates of disease risk in other populations.

Researchers from the CDC and Georgia Tech tested the efficacy of using whole-genome shotgun sequencing to diagnose food-borne pathogens in outbreaks.

A Georgia Tech team used random mutagenesis on a red fluorescent protein gene to develop a phylogeny to test algorithms that reconstruct ancestral sequences.

Georgia Tech researchers used high-performance mass spectrometry to uncover a highly accurate 16-marker signature that identifies women with ovarian cancer.

The method combines post-translational modification data and 3D protein structure data to identify known and novel biologically significant hotspots.

The methods could help researchers understand how ribonucleotides change the structure and function of DNA and chromatin.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Recessive inherited disease risk may be incrementally notched up over time in human populations by a process called biased gene conversion, according to a study appearing online yesterday

A group of researchers from Stanford University, Emory University, and the Georgia Institute of Technology, have published a study evaluating how whole-genome sequencing could be used alongside traditional clinical evaluation in preventive medicine.

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Reuters reports that UK researchers are using gene-editing tools to develop flu-resistant chickens.

Nature calls for genomics to become part of the World Health Organization's cholera surveillance approach.

Vox explores a proposal to institute a lottery system to award grant funds.

In Genome Biology this week: gut microbiome study of individuals from Tanzania and Botswana, sixth version of the Network of Cancer Genes database, and more.