Genomics England

Rare Answers

Sequencing is enabling the roots of some rare diseases to be determined, the Financial Times reports.

Congenica will use the proceeds to establish its presence in the US and China, where it will court not only clinical genetics labs, but specialists, academics, biotech, and pharma.

The company will use the proceeds from the round to invest in sales and marketing efforts for its Sapientia clinical genome analysis platform, as well as for R&D.

Genomics England will use the product to aid scientists and clinicians in 13 National Health Service Genomic Medical Centres with clinical reporting and interpretation.

The center, which is seen as a bellwether for integrating genomic information with EMRs, will use the data to inform efforts to prevent chronic, common diseases.

Genomics plc will analyze de-identified genomics data for the consortium to inform pharmaceutical research and development investment decisions.

Genomics England will use the system to help in its clinical reporting for the 100,000 Genome Project's cancer program.

Proponents believe the Million European Genomes Alliance will spur research, stimulate the life sciences economy, and ultimately improve clinical care.

The partnership is part of a broader agreement between Genome BC and Genomics England to share data and tools around cancer and rare and infectious diseases.

The companies are planning to build a platform and database that can be used to improve and automate the interpretation of genomic data.

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A fire at a Manchester hospital may have destroyed lab equipment and data, the Guardian reports.

Researchers generate a genetic database from skeletal remains from the 1845 Franklin Expedition to the Arctic, Live Science reports.

Researchers in China have begun another trial using CRISPR/Cas9 approaches in cancer patients, according to the Wall Street Journal.

In Science this week: human DNA found in sediments from archeological sites lacking bones, and more.