Genome BC

Genome Canada and its partners recently funded two new initiatives with C$255 that will back precision medicine, genomics, and technology development.

DivSeek was established in 2015 to support the genomic characterization of the 7 million crop accessions currently being stored at gene banks around the world.

Microbiome Insights provides next-generation sequencing-based analytical testing and consulting services to microbiome researchers in academia and industry.

The two projects aim to use genomics to prevent the spread of drug-resistant bacteria and expand the use of genomic testing in cancer, respectively.

The project aims to developa system to automate the coring of tumor samples based on identified targets for DNA and RNA extraction.

Despite highly effective HCV drugs, testing for resistance mutations is important to prevent the spread of resistant strains and to tailor treatment.

The consortium is collecting data from different omics streams for a cohort of individuals with autism spectrum disorders with the long-term goal of improving treatment.

The partners are planning a joint research center at Providence Health Care's St. Paul's Hospital in Vancouver and a center of excellence in China.

The partnership is part of a broader agreement between Genome BC and Genomics England to share data and tools around cancer and rare and infectious diseases.

The team will employ reverse vaccinology coupled with high-throughput genomics approaches, such as RNA-seq, to deliver the new vaccines within four years.

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The New York Times reports that evidence linking trauma in one generation to epigenetic effects that influence subsequent generations may be overstated.

ScienceInsider reports that US National Institutes of Health researchers were told in the fall they could not obtain new human fetal tissue.

In PNAS this week: skin pigmentation evolution among KhoeSan, biomarkers for dengue virus progression, and more.