FORCE

Genetic counselors and patient advocates say more people are refusing genetic testing because they're uncertain of how it will impact their insurance.

Women with a family history of breast and ovarian cancer who are interested in getting genetically tested to gauge whether they have a heightened risk for the diseases should speak to a genetic counselor before getting tested, patient groups are advising their members.

This article has been updated to correct that Ellen Matloff is a plaintiff in AMP v. USPTO.

At a SACGHS meeting last week, FORCE said that Myriad Genetics sales representatives discourage doctors from referring patients to genetic counselors, and recommended the committee make recommendations for greater monitoring of such actions. SACGHS plans to invite Myriad to respond to the allegations.

The Trump Administration has proposed a plan to reorganize the federal government, the Washington Post reports.

Lawmakers have asked four direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies to explain their privacy policies and security measures, according to Stat News.

In Science this week: genetic overlap among many psychiatric disorders, and more.

The Economist writes that an increasing number of scientific journals don't do peer review.