FORCE

Genetic counselors and patient advocates say more people are refusing genetic testing because they're uncertain of how it will impact their insurance.

Women with a family history of breast and ovarian cancer who are interested in getting genetically tested to gauge whether they have a heightened risk for the diseases should speak to a genetic counselor before getting tested, patient groups are advising their members.

This article has been updated to correct that Ellen Matloff is a plaintiff in AMP v. USPTO.

At a SACGHS meeting last week, FORCE said that Myriad Genetics sales representatives discourage doctors from referring patients to genetic counselors, and recommended the committee make recommendations for greater monitoring of such actions. SACGHS plans to invite Myriad to respond to the allegations.

An Australian-led team has generated a draft genome assembly of the invasive cane toad in hopes it will help in population control, the Sydney Morning Herald reports.

The New York Times reports that the US Department of Defense has implemented about half the recommendations made to improve safe handling of dangerous agents.

In PLOS this week: approach for teasing out archaic introgression in human genomes, immune transcription features in HCV infection, and more.

Stat News reports that Maryland is promoting itself to the biotech industry with a mobile billboard.