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A recent study from New York University found Abbott's ID Now rapid point-of-care test could return false negative results.

With the US now awash in positive samples, assay developers seeking authorization will no longer be allowed to use contrived samples.

The company's Linea COVID-19 assay kit is a high-sensitivity real-time, reverse-transcriptase PCR-based assay to detect target sequences of the SARS-CoV-2 Spike gene.

The paper, which is not peer-reviewed, said that use of the test as a first-step screening tool would require confirmation of more than 80 percent of its results.

The diagnostics firm is conducting a 1,000-person study to find T cell profiles associated with the immune response to COVID-19 and recovery from the disease.

The test is designed to detect the SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid gene in nasopharyngeal, oropharyngeal, nasal, and midturbinate nasal swab samples.

The test is designed to detect the E and RdRp genes of SARS-CoV-2 in various respiratory specimens including nasopharyngeal swabs and nasal aspirates.

The PCR-based test received EUA for use on the Alinity m platform after receiving authorization in March on the firm's m2000 RealTime System. 

Antigen Detection

The US Food and Drug Administration has issued an Emergency Use Authorization for Quidel's antigen test for SARS-CoV-2, 360Dx reports.

The PCR-based tests are designed to detect the SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid gene in various respiratory specimens including oropharyngeal swabs.

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NPR writes that even with thousands of new COVID-19 papers, each should be evaluated based on its own quality.

Researchers traced a gene cluster linked to COVID-19 severity to Neanderthals, the New York Times reports.

In PNAS this week: soil bacteria-derived small molecules affect centrosomal protein, microfluidics approach for capturing circulating tumor cells, and more.

The Washington Post reports on researchers' efforts to determine the effect of an increasingly common SARS-CoV-2 mutation.