Close Menu

FBI

A new pilot program aims to identify DNA matches between Florida felons and unsolved crimes nationwide.

Creeping Changes

The Verge writes that the plan to collect migrants' DNA and add it to an FBI database will change the tenor of that database.

As 2020 dawns, forensic genomics is poised for growth as companies aim to harness the power of consumer databases coupled with advances in sequencing.

Verogen's ForenSeq kit and Thermo Fisher Scientific's Precision ID Whole Genome Panel can now be used to create DNA profiles for a national repository.

Concerning Links

The Irish Times reports that US lawmakers and law enforcement agencies are concerned about ties between the US and Chinese genomics firms.

Forensic laboratories can now use the Applied Biosystems Precision ID System mtDNA analysis to submit profiles to a national database.

Oh, This Code

The Wall Street Journal examines billing codes used by uBiome.

The FBI approved the MiSeq FGx Forensic Genomics System for use by forensic labs for generating DNA profiles for the National DNA Index System.

The moves come in the wake of an FBI search of the company's San Francisco office as part of an investigation into its billing practices.

FBI Search at uBiome

The Wall Street Journal reports that the Federal Bureau of Investigation has searched uBiome's office as part of an inquiry into its billing practices.

Pages

The Washington Post reports on researchers' efforts to determine the effect of an increasingly common SARS-CoV-2 mutation.

Florida Politics reports Florida's law barring life, long-term care, and disability insurers from using genetic information in coverage decisions went into effect at the beginning of July.

A new analysis finds a link between popular media coverage of a scientific study and how often that paper is cited.

In Nature this week: CRISPR approaches to editing plant genomes, way to speed up DNA-PAINT, and more.