EU

'Could Lose Our Edge'

A new report suggests the UK's stature in science and research could fall post-Brexit, the Guardian reports.

Areas of concern are the recruitment of talented scientists, as well as retaining access to EU funding, European research collaborations, and clinical trials.

Waiting to See

British and foreign researchers brace for the effects of the UK leaving the EU, the Associated Press reports.

The European Commission may exempt researchers from a copyright law to enable data mining, according to Nature News.

Proponents believe the Million European Genomes Alliance will spur research, stimulate the life sciences economy, and ultimately improve clinical care.

Interviews with leading UK scientists revealed apprehension about losing access to European funding, limitations on freedom of movement, and an exodus of biotechs to the EU.

Already Left Out

Uncertainty in funding following the Brexit vote has led some UK researchers to be left out of European consortiums, the Guardian reports.

Researchers in the UK react to the vote there to leave the European Union.

Called CanPathPro, the research consortium aims to combine omics data and systems biology tools into a single commercial platform for testing cancer hypotheses.

Most researchers in the UK oppose leaving the European Union, Technology Review reports.

Pages

Researchers test gene therapy targeting a different cancer protein in a new trial, the New York Times reports.

Pennsylvania State University researchers found that salivary microRNAs could predict which kids would have longer concussion symptoms, according to NPR.

The Associated Press reports Alex Azar, the new Department of Health and Human Services secretary nominee, made millions of dollars as a pharmaceutical executive.

In PNAS this week: immune profiling of breast cancer, transposable element patterns in rice, and more.