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Under the Phenotypic Drug Discovery program, researchers from academia or biotech submit candidate compounds in specific therapeutic areas for Lilly to evaluate and profile. Participating organizations retain full IP rights to the compounds, but Lilly receives first rights to negotiate a broader collaboration or licensing agreement.

NHLBI in late January put out an RFP for the program, which calls for researchers to develop proteomics technologies and apply them to solve clinical puzzles. It is set to begin early next year, shortly after its current two major proteomics initiatives expire.

The panel of proteomics experts told attendees of the annual meeting of the US Human Proteome Organization that the science is not ready for clinical use and the discipline has become marginalized compared to genomics.

Some researchers, like Ruedi Aebersold, claim that because tools such as mass specs are in a "perpetual discovery mode, the high-performance application of the [the tools] will remain in specialized labs."

Eli Lilly, Cornell University, and the Kauffman Foundation's iBridge Network each unveiled web-based initiatives for facilitating tech transfer at last week's Association of University Technology Managers annual meeting.

Funding from the National Institutes of Health for all proteomics-related research shrank by almost 3 percent in fiscal 2008, according to an analysis of NIH data by ProteoMonitor.

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23andMe and Airbnb have partnered to offer "heritage travel," according to Venture Beat.

China may include regulations protecting genes and embryos in its update of its civil code, Nature News reports.

In Nature this week: exome sequence analysis of individuals with type 2 diabetes, genomic prediction of maize yield across environments, and more.

NPR reports on efforts to engineer bacteriophages to destroy antibiotic-resistance bacteria.