ENCODE | GenomeWeb

ENCODE

DNAnexus' platform will support data analysis and sharing for the third phase of the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements project.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: Mouse ENCODE results, and more.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – A team led by researchers from the Human Proteome Organization's Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project has completed a study using data from the National Human Genome Research Institute's Encyclopedia of DNA Elements Consortium (ENCODE) to aid in identification of previ

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – A set of studies published online today in Nature offers a look at similarities and differences detected in the regulatory machinery over time and across organisms.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The National Institute of Mental Health plans to provide around $4 million in Fiscal Year 2014 to support research efforts under the PsychENCODE project.

This story was originally posted on Oct. 24

The National Human Genome Research Institute has awarded nearly $9 million in bioinformatics-related grants in fiscal year 2012 as part of a $30 million effort to expand the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements, or ENCODE, project.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The National Human Genome Research Institute has awarded $30.3 million in new grants to expand its Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project, a long-term effort to catalog all of the functional gene regulatory networks in the human genome.

This article was originally posted on Sept. 13.

The question of proteomics' place in the larger world of life science research drove discussion this week at the Human Proteome Organization's 11th annual meeting in Boston as researchers gathered to report on the field's progression and potential as well as the obstac

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Biomedical research projects are generating a ton of data that still needs to be analyzed, NPR reports.

Theranos is retiring some of its board members, including Henry Kissinger and George Shultz, Business Insider reports.

The heads of 29 scientific societies and some 2,300 researchers call on President-elect Donald Trump to rely on and support science in two separate letters.

In Science this week: genetically modified flu virus could be key to new live vaccines, and more.