EMBL

The uncultured candidate bacterial species increase the diversity of human gut bacterial lineages almost threefold and will benefit future research.

Two research groups have cultured and sequenced microbes in fecal samples from healthy volunteers, producing new reference genomes for hundreds of species.

The Darwin Tree of Life Project aims to sequence the genetic codes of 66,000 different species in the UK as part of the Earth BioGenome Project.

Led by researchers at BBMRI-ERIC, the effort intends to clarify how entities should share data, including genomics information, across institutions and countries.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: series of reviews about gene modification, and more.

Multi-Omics Factor Analysis looks for underlying causes of tumor variations by parsing and weighting genomic, epigenomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic data.

The funding will be used to support the the newly established ME/CFS Collaborative Research Center at Stanford University.

The team tested 21 protocols for extracting DNA from human fecal microbiome samples to recommend one to improve comparability between studies.

The team aims to release the new resource sometime next year, with the hope that it will become as widely used as other institute databases.

The four-year project, which ended in 2010, collected DNA samples and lifestyle information from half a million people from the UK.

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NPR reports that researchers in Italy are testing a gene drive aimed at controlling mosquito populations.

Researchers may experience the effects of the government shutdown for a while, the Los Angeles Times reports.

A new study finds that the majority of patients at a Tijuana clinic received a diagnosis after first-line genome sequencing, the San Diego Union-Tribune reports.

In Genome Biology this week: post-transcriptional modification-based stratification of glioblastoma, single-cell analysis of gene expression and methylation in human iPSCs, and more.