EEOC

EEOC final rules provide employers clarity on wellness programs, but they may confuse the public about genetic privacy and anti-discrimination laws, some groups said.

Although there are many objections to EEOC proposed changes, some in the business community want more liberal regulations around wellness program inducements.

The final regulations detailing GINA's employer section aim to simplify rules and definitions, and to provide safe harbor and guidance for businesses.

As the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission prepares its discrimination policy, it has collected comments from stakeholders regarding genetic information, incidental errors, and protection for employers and employees.

At the public meeting, speakers from groups representing employers and employees pointed out the need for the EEOC to clarify "inadvertent acquisition" of genetic information under which employers would not be held in violation of the law and to provide specific examples of the types of genetic information linked to "manifested diseases" which the law does not protect.

The law's Title II section and 'firewall' protections may be at the center of discussion as EEOC drafts its regulations.

Direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies have offered to test families separated at the southern US border, but that raises ethical issues.

CNBC reports that confirming a positive result from 23andMe's BRCA health report can be expensive.

The New York Times reports on a project to develop a tree DNA database to uncover illegal logging.

In PLOS this week: links between gut microbiome and colorectal cancer mutations, targeted sequencing uncovers genetic susceptibilities to epilepsy in Koreans, and more.