EBI

The team aims to release the new resource sometime next year, with the hope that it will become as widely used as other institute databases.

Areas of concern are the recruitment of talented scientists, as well as retaining access to EU funding, European research collaborations, and clinical trials.

The release has been accompanied by acute interest from the genomics community, which views the resource as a "game changer" for anyone working in human genetics.

The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium has systematically studied knockout mice to find new disease models and candidate disease genes.

The computational method, called DeepCpG, is designed to tease out missing epigenetic marks and related DNA motifs in single-cell DNA methylation data.

EBI researchers find that, in mice, the genetics of one cage mate influences the other's health.

Interviews with leading UK scientists revealed apprehension about losing access to European funding, limitations on freedom of movement, and an exodus of biotechs to the EU.

The portal offers access to genotype, phenotype, and clinical data related to type 2 diabetes as well as computational tools for querying the information. 

Researchers used genomic approaches to search for disease clues in purified cells from ileum or colon biopsies of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients.

Researchers from EBI, Georgetown, and others are mapping protein annotations to the human reference genome to it more easily accessible.

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The Seattle Times writes that pharmacogenomics testing can help choose medications that may work best for people with depression.

Researchers report that deleting one gene from butterflies affects their wing coloration patterns, according to the Washington Post.

In PNAS this week: genome sequencing of weevil symbionts, retinoid X receptor deletion in lung cancer metastasis, and more.

Sequencing could help combat foodborne illnesses, according to a blog post by Food and Drug Administration officials.