Duke

Durio zibethinus

Using new genome and transcriptome sequences, researchers saw expansions and expression jumps in sulfur and fruit ripening pathways in Durio zibethinus.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: host contributors to typhoid fever risk, effects of obesity-related variants near TMEM18, and more.

Scientists at Duke University have found that a gene variant that affects cholesterol levels can potentially increase a patient's risk of contracting typhoid fever.

Try the Other Version

Researchers find that a personalized medicine approach could help people who experience pain while taking statins, New Scientist reports.

An analysis of six "Implementing Genomics in Practice" (IGNITE) consortium network projects pointed to three main challenges in implementing genomic medicine.

With Cas9 constructs fused to expression activators or repressors, researchers targeted chromatin-accessible sites to screen for regulatory element activity.

The semifinalists will receive $50,000 each to develop prototypes of their concepts for submission in the second phase of the challenge.

Two alleles work together to influence multiple sclerosis risk, a Duke University-led team has found.

Tempus will provide sequencing and analysis for glioblastoma patients in a clinical trial at Duke using engineered poliovirus as a treatment.

Heterozygous deletions at the chromosome 22q11.2 locus contribute to kidney problems in individuals with DiGeorge syndrome or congenital urogenital conditions.

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The New York Times reports that as China invests in science, it also is dealing with research fraud.

In PLOS this week: transcriptome study of a cold-tolerant plant, deep sequencing of clinical influenza A samples, and more.

The Atlantic writes that retrotransposons like BovB have proliferated in a number of genomes.

Researchers have sequenced the genome of a man who lived in China some 40,000 years ago, according to UPI.