Duke

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: host genetic variants affecting Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia, differentially methylated regions in lung cancer, and more.

Cells that express genes linked to greater proliferation potential are more likely to downregulate the HIV provirus, according to a new study.

The Durham, North Carolina-based startup's platform uses an image-based, tissue box-sized tool that cultures cells to capture long-term phenotypic behavior.

Researchers integrated results from a pathogen-host association study with available clinical data to find variants influencing both infection responses and other disease risks.

Genes for Success

Education-linked genetic variants could also predict a small portion of a person's social mobility, Newsweek reports.

For the Ferns

Researchers have sequenced two fern species for the first time and uncovered some fern-specific genes, according to Discover's D-brief blog.

A modified poliovirus could be a promising treatment for brain cancer, according to NPR.

A multi-region analysis of colorectal cancers suggests samples from opposite sides of a tumor can help trace early, invasiveness-related tumor characteristics.

Speakers at HudsonAlpha's Genomic Medicine Conference said while sequencing results sometimes result in a diagnosis and change in care, they often have no consequence.

Researchers are exploring alternative ways to return genetic testing results to grapple with the anticipated increase in testing and see a role for the web.

Pages

NPR reports that with medical data being big business, some companies want to get patients involved.

The Asbury Park Press reports on the startup Genomic Prediction's test to determine an embryo's risk of disease.

In PNAS this week: optical mapping allows glimpse of structural variants, disease-linked GATA2 mutations boosts its protein activity, and more.

Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) has released the results of a genetic ancestry analysis, the Boston Globe reports.