Dana-Farber

Broad Institute and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute researchers have released the first annotated genomic data as part of a public data sharing effort in this disease. 

CEO Anders Rylander said the company will initially market its DiviTum assay for breast cancer cases, though it could be used to monitor cell proliferation in all cancer types.

Researchers are now using the approach to allow genome-wide sequencing to monitor disease and to investigate treatment response and resistance without the need for tissue biopsy.

Alterations affecting the antigen presentation-related gene B2M appeared to be over-represented in melanomas with checkpoint blockade non-response or resistance.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: trait prediction algorithm, missense mutation linked to hearing loss, and more.

Neon Therapeutics is sponsoring a Phase Ib trial of neoantigen-based vaccines in combination with anti-PD-1 treatment in melanoma, lung cancer, and bladder cancer.

Two independent research teams published findings for melanoma patients treated with vaccines developed against neo-antigens in their tumors that sequencing uncovered.

At Bio-IT World, Harvard bioinformatics researcher John Quackenbush called typical methods for determining genetic relevance relics of "Mendel and his peas."

Shared gastric adenocarcinoma tumor features seem to span geography and ethnicity, despite shifts in the proportion of tumors from different molecular subtypes.

One speaker cited the success of screening Ashkenazi Jewish women for BRCA mutations, but another said extending testing to a wider population could be harder.

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The US Food and Drug Administration has new guidelines that enable some gene and cell therapies to undergo expedited review, according to the New York Times.

Using gene drives to control invasive species might be too risky, an initial advocate of the approach says.

In Science this week: intellectual property experts argue patent battles such as the one over CRISPR are wasteful, and more.

Researchers have grown tumors in 3D cell cultures to better understand cancer, the Economist reports.