Dana-Farber

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: trait prediction algorithm, missense mutation linked to hearing loss, and more.

Neon Therapeutics is sponsoring a Phase Ib trial of neoantigen-based vaccines in combination with anti-PD-1 treatment in melanoma, lung cancer, and bladder cancer.

Two independent research teams published findings for melanoma patients treated with vaccines developed against neo-antigens in their tumors that sequencing uncovered.

At Bio-IT World, Harvard bioinformatics researcher John Quackenbush called typical methods for determining genetic relevance relics of "Mendel and his peas."

Shared gastric adenocarcinoma tumor features seem to span geography and ethnicity, despite shifts in the proportion of tumors from different molecular subtypes.

One speaker cited the success of screening Ashkenazi Jewish women for BRCA mutations, but another said extending testing to a wider population could be harder.

The developers said such a signature could help triage people exposed to radiation through war, a terrorist attack, or an industrial accident.

Researchers identified mutations present prior to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation that coincided with MDS survival and relapse.

Alterations to Target

Researchers find that genetic testing of pediatric brain cancer can uncover clinically relevant alterations, Technology Review reports.

The results of the Harvard-led study suggest that the immune system struggles to infiltrate and attack tumors with more aneuploidy.

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Even when given the option, not too many authors choose double-blinded peer-review for their manuscripts, ScienceInsider reports.

In PNAS this week: transcriptional read-through in stressed cells, genome stability role for the epigenetic regulator CTCF, and more.

The Save the Redwoods League is teaming with researchers to sequence the genomes of the coast redwood and giant sequoia.

Two researchers have found that behavioral genetic defenses in criminal cases don't tend to affect outcomes, according to Popular Science.