CSHL

In Genome Research this week: inversion variants mapped in human, non-human primate genomes; transcriptome profiling of maize, sorghum; and more.

The company will use the funds to further develop its cloud-based alternative splicing analysis platform for drug discovery.

Apology for Toasting

Eric Lander has apologized for toasting Nobel laureate James Watson, who has espoused racist, sexist, and anti-Semitic views, Stat News reports.

In a talk at the meeting, Riken's Piero Carninci described the RADICL-seq tool he and his colleagues developed.

A research institute bearing Nobel laureate James Watson's name is to be built in China, though Science reports its namesake is not sure it will go forward.

Independent teams used ScarTrace and MAP-seq to follow cell type development in zebrafish and characterize axonal projections in the mouse visual cortex, respectively.

Using exome sequence and questionnaire data, researchers saw links between motor skills and likely gene disruptive or missense de novo mutations.

The NIH has awarded $169 million this year to support 110 new projects in the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies Initiative.

The researchers' techniques will enable an understanding of brain circuitry and allow them to study disease models of autism and schizophrenia.

This Week in Cell

In Cell this week: regulatory changes in pancreatic cancer, metabolic shifts in Alzheimer's disease, and more.

Pages

In a commentary at eLife, Brandeis University's Eve Marder calls on researchers to value and pursue truth.

Researchers have developed a way to quickly edit white blood cells, according to the New York Times.

In Science this week: rice gene enables plants to grow quickly in times of flooding, and more.

Education-linked genetic variants could also predict a small portion of a person's social mobility, Newsweek reports.