CRUK

Research continues to show that it is possible to detect genetic signs of cancer in a blood sample without the need to measure specific oncogenic mutations.

Led by investigators at the University of Trento in Italy, the team received a five-year, £5 million ($6.4 million) award recently to advance its work.

The American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting wrapped up today in Chicago. Below are selected business briefs from the conference.

The company is collaborating with two UK institutes to assess whether its Signatera ctDNA technology can detect disease recurrence in women treated for breast cancer.

Areas of concern are the recruitment of talented scientists, as well as retaining access to EU funding, European research collaborations, and clinical trials.

A fire at a Manchester hospital may have destroyed lab equipment and data, the Guardian reports.

The two studies came out of the UK's Tracking Cancer Evolution through Therapy (TRACERx) trial.

Speakers at the conference's opening plenary showed how their work in cancer research fit into the broad theme of 'Discover, Predict, Prevent, Treat.'

The new funding supports clinical trials as well as preclinical work to identify biomarkers of therapeutic response. 

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The Washington Post reports on a Federal Bureau of Investigation plan to place rapid DNA analyzers at booking stations around the country.

In an editorial, officials from scientific societies in the US and China call for the international community to develop criteria and standards for human germline editing.

The US National Institutes of Health is to review studies that have received private support for conflicts of interest, according to the New York Times.

In Science this week: the PsychENCODE Consortium reports on the molecular mechanisms of neuropsychiatric disorders, and more.