CRUK

The American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting wrapped up today in Chicago. Below are selected business briefs from the conference.

The company is collaborating with two UK institutes to assess whether its Signatera ctDNA technology can detect disease recurrence in women treated for breast cancer.

Areas of concern are the recruitment of talented scientists, as well as retaining access to EU funding, European research collaborations, and clinical trials.

A fire at a Manchester hospital may have destroyed lab equipment and data, the Guardian reports.

The two studies came out of the UK's Tracking Cancer Evolution through Therapy (TRACERx) trial.

Speakers at the conference's opening plenary showed how their work in cancer research fit into the broad theme of 'Discover, Predict, Prevent, Treat.'

The new funding supports clinical trials as well as preclinical work to identify biomarkers of therapeutic response. 

The researchers will sequence the genomes and transcriptomes of 250 breast cancer patients in the first phase, returning information from 16 actionable genes. 

Inivata plans to use the new funds to accelerate clinical studies to validate its liquid biopsy technology platform and commercialize its first products.

The work identified specific groups of somatic mutations that might be ideal to hunt for in ctDNA to monitor tumor burden, guide treatment, or follow therapeutic response.

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An Australian-led team has generated a draft genome assembly of the invasive cane toad in hopes it will help in population control, the Sydney Morning Herald reports.

The New York Times reports that the US Department of Defense has implemented about half the recommendations made to improve safe handling of dangerous agents.

In PLOS this week: approach for teasing out archaic introgression in human genomes, immune transcription features in HCV infection, and more.

Stat News reports that Maryland is promoting itself to the biotech industry with a mobile billboard.