CPTC | GenomeWeb


VANCOUVER, BC – At the American Society for Mass Spectrometry annual meeting here this week a number of major vendors reiterated their commitment to moving their instruments into the clinic (

The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer Initiative this week issued a request for targets for monoclonal antibody production and characterization as part of its Antibody Characterization Program.

This story originally ran on Oct. 6

By Adam Bonislawski
As scientists increasingly adopt proteomics as a research tool and mass spectrometers reach ever-faster acquisition rates, the amount of data being generated by the field is growing exponentially.

By Adam Bonislawski
Theranostics Health has licensed a new fixative developed by researchers at George Mason University that could significantly improve the quality of tissue samples available to proteomic researchers.

This story originally ran on Aug. 22 and has been updated to include comments from a participant.
By Adam Bonislawski

BGI, which, according to an official, generated roughly $6.2 million in proteomics revenue last year, plans to buy around 15 new high-resolution machines and 30 to 40 triple quadrupoles as part of its efforts to expand into the clinical proteomics and pharma markets.

The CPTC initiative aims to offer one award for a base period of one year plus four one-year options to develop and maintain a data center in support of the second phase of the project, in which six to eight teams will molecularly characterize four to six tumor types.

The call for targets, from which CPTC expects to select 40 to 50 proteins for antibody development, is part of a pilot effort exploring the organization's ability to receive and process such requests from the extramural research community.

With most presentations avoiding promises of immediate clinical utility, post-translational modifications emerged as a primary area of consideration at the initiative's annual meeting, held this week in Bethesda, Md.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: ProTraits includes genetic, phenotypic data on bacteria, archaea; Candida albicans assembly 22; and more.

The Wall Street Journal reports that researchers are looking beyond Cas9 for CRISPR editing.

Familial DNA searches in criminal cases are winning over some critics, the Los Angeles Times reports.

In PNAS this week: miR-515 levels higher in women with preeclampsia, horizontal gene transfer in parasitic plants, and more.