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This story originally ran on Oct. 6

By Adam Bonislawski
Theranostics Health has licensed a new fixative developed by researchers at George Mason University that could significantly improve the quality of tissue samples available to proteomic researchers.

This story originally ran on Aug. 22 and has been updated to include comments from a participant.
By Adam Bonislawski

BGI, which, according to an official, generated roughly $6.2 million in proteomics revenue last year, plans to buy around 15 new high-resolution machines and 30 to 40 triple quadrupoles as part of its efforts to expand into the clinical proteomics and pharma markets.

The company, called SISCAPA Assay Technologies, will offer assay development to pharmas and CROs and has tapped antibody firm Epitomics to produce reagents for the system and sell SISCAPA kits. So far, the company has licensed the technology to Pfizer for internal use.

The CPTC initiative aims to offer one award for a base period of one year plus four one-year options to develop and maintain a data center in support of the second phase of the project, in which six to eight teams will molecularly characterize four to six tumor types.

The call for targets, from which CPTC expects to select 40 to 50 proteins for antibody development, is part of a pilot effort exploring the organization's ability to receive and process such requests from the extramural research community.

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A Harvard University professor has been charged with making false claims regarding funds he received from China, the New York Times reports.

Discover magazine reports that animal dissections might dissuade students from science careers, but that a firm has developed synthetic frogs for dissections.

Nature News reports that a US panel is reviewing current guidelines for federally funded gain-of-function viral research.

In PNAS this week: de novo mutation patterns among the Amish, an alternative RNA-seq method, and more.