Cornell

Drive Resistance

Gene drives might run into biological resistance, the Economist reports.

Through the alliance, Cornell has joined the Consortium for Sequencing the Food Supply Chain, an initiative launched by IBM and Mars in early 2015.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: efforts to recode the Salmonella typhimurium LT2 genome, Human Genome Variation Archive database, and more.

Test of Moths

A Cornell researcher wants to test genetically engineered moths in upstate New York, ABC News reports.

Work presented at the Biology of Genomes meeting found that there is no one signature of dysbiosis in the gut microbiome.

Cornell and Life Technologies sued Illumina in 2010, alleging Illumina's microarray products infringed on eight of their patents. 

The funding will, in part, support efforts to expand the project's catalog of functional elements and understand their roles in different contexts.

The grants are provided through the NSF's Early Concept Grants for Exploratory Research program in partnership with the National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

Using mitochondrial sequence data for hundreds of simplex families, investigators found predicted pathogenic heteroplasmic mutations were over-represented.

The 'Olympiome' project aims to see whether the influx of hundreds of thousands of visitors can influence a city's microbiome.

Pages

Technology Review reports that researchers in the US have used CRISPR to modify a number of human embryos.

By introducing genes from butterfly peas and Canterbury bells, researchers in Japan have developed a blue chrysanthemum, according to NPR.

Plant researchers plan to sequence some 10,000 samples that represent the major plant clades, ScienceInsider reports.

In Nature this week: a Danish reference genome, and more.