Columbia

Family Ties

A Columbia University-led team used emergency contact information from medical records to create family trees and estimate disease heritability.

Down to One Person

Science speaks with Columbia University's Yaniv Erlich about using genetic genealogical data to identify people.

A study in Microbiome finds that heavy drinkers have an unhealthy mix of bacteria in their mouths.

Of Mice and Microbes

Mice in New York harbor both antibiotic-resistant bacteria and novel viruses, according to a new analysis of their fecal microbiomes.

Retraction Watch reports that the Nature Methods paper finding off-target effects of the CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing machinery has been retracted.

The health system hopes to pair the data with nearly three decades worth of electronic health records as well as medical histories provided by contributors.

In a pilot study of 92 individuals with familial or suspected genetic chronic kidney disease, researchers successfully diagnosed 24 percent of cases with exome sequencing.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: de novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathy, sequencing analysis of aromatic rice, and more.

Using a portable DNA sequencer and a Bayesian algorithm, researchers reported being able to reidentify humans from DNA within minutes of sequencing.

The funding will support three research centers and a data management and coordinating center investigating myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome.

Pages

Researchers have sequenced the northern white rhinoceros to gauge whether it could be brought back from the edge of extinction, the New York Times reports.

Bavaria expands its forensic genetic analyses to include DNA phenotyping, raising discrimination concerns.

Tufts University researchers found a role for miRNA in transmitting stress between generations, the Economist reports.

In Science this week: gut microbiome influences liver cancer growth, spread; and more.