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This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: genomic factors that influence glioblastoma response to anti-PD-1 therapy, sequencing test for infectious disease, and more.

For Smarts?

A trio of researchers writes at Stat News that while editing embryos to improve IQ is not yet possible, there's already a way to predict which embryos might be the smartest.

Researchers identified PTEN mutations, MAP kinase pathway alterations, and other features linked to anti-PD-1 response in individuals with the brain cancer.

Basic Editing

NPR reports on ongoing basic research involving CRISPR and human embryos in the US.

Two new studies found that prenatal whole-exome sequencing could uncover clinically significant variants in an additional 8 to 12 percent of fetuses with structural anomalies.

A new analysis found kidney disease-related pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants in exomes for roughly 9 percent of individuals with chronic kidney disease.

The New York Department of Health-certified tests are based on proprietary algorithms licensed from Columbia University, which offers them in the US.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: MYRF variant linked to congenital diaphragmatic hernia, analysis of the "dragon's blood" red resin produced by traditional medicine plants, and more.

Researchers identified germline and somatic changes that marked low-grade and high-grade cases in adults and children with a condition called neurofibromatosis 1.

Researchers identified immune activity changes in first-trimester placenta and decidua samples profiled through single-cell RNA sequencing.

Pages

Bloomberg reports that the DNA-for-cash deal reported in Kentucky might be a more widespread scam.

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have treated infants with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency using gene therapy in an early phase study.

St. Louis Public Radio reports that some African Americans are turning to DNA ancestry testing to help guide genealogical searches.

In Nature this week: a genomic analysis of the snailfish Pseudoliparis swirei, ancient DNA analysis gives insight into the introduction of farming to England, and more.