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The US has upgraded its network of public health labs to provide whole-genome sequencing to track antibiotic-resistant bacteria, Quartz reports.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates more people get sick and die from drug-resistant germs than previously thought, the Washington Post reports.

In PLOS this week: computational approach, analysis of chronic granulomas, and more.

Keep Them or Not?

NPR says the explosion and fire earlier this week at a Russian lab that stores dangerous pathogens revives the question of whether such samples should be kept.

The New York Times reports that some research at United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases has been halted over safety concerns.

Frieden Pleads Guilty

Thomas Frieden, the former director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has pleaded guilty to a disorderly conduct violation, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Group K said that the partners are developing a RT-LAMP system for use at the point of care in resource-limited areas where real-time RT-PCR is not available.

The budget calls for $34.4 billion for the NIH in the coming fiscal year, including $492 million in resources made available through the 21st Century Cures Act.

Sequencing has helped identify where an E. coli outbreak may have originated, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports.

A partial US government shutdown would affect scientific research, Nature News says.

Pages

Gene editing could be an issue competitive sports need to address soon, four researchers from Arizona State University write at Slate.

A genetic alteration appears to increase heart failure risk among people of African descent, according to the Washington Post.

In his look back at the past decade, BuzzFeed News' Peter Aldhous writes that direct-to-consumer genetic testing has led to "Facebook for genes."

In Nature this week: genetic "clock" that can predict the lifespans of vertebrates, new assembler called wtdbg2, and more.