CalTech

A new assay uses digital loop-mediated isothermal amplification (dLAMP) to perform phenotypic antibacterial susceptibility testing in 30 minutes.

Teeny Tiny DNA Robot

Popular Mechanics reports that Caltech researchers have built a prototype nanobot using DNA.

The funding will be used to develop new software and data structures to enable researchers to use the GO data for network-based analysis. 

The funding will, in part, support efforts to expand the project's catalog of functional elements and understand their roles in different contexts.

Jet Propulsion Laboratory researchers characterized the International Space Station's microbiome, finding that it's dominated by a skin-linked bacterium.

The California Institute of Technology has been awarded

Using a microfluidic device called SlipChip, a cell phone camera, and cloud computing, a California Institute of Technology team has shown the superiority of digital over real-time isothermal PCR under perturbed experimental conditions.

Fluidigm of South San Francisco, Calif., has received US Patent No.

The California Institute of Technology of Pasadena has received US Patent No. 8,557,199, "Self-powered microfluidic devices, methods and systems." The claimed device consists of microfluidic channels and a pressure source for pumping reagents through the channels.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – A pair of genome sequencing studies appearing online yesterday in Genome Biology is stirring enthusiasm about the prospect of getting at the genetic roots of drug resistance in Haemonchus contortus — commonly known as the barber pole worm — and coming

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Technology Review reports that 2017 was the year of consumer genetic testing and that it could spur new analysis companies.

A phylogenetic analysis indicates two venomous Australian spiders are more closely related than thought, the International Business Times reports.

In Science this week: CRISPR-based approach for recording cellular events, and more.

A new company says it will analyze customers' genes to find them a suitable date, though Smithsonian magazine says the science behind it might be shaky.