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Brown University

Individuals with autism spectrum disorder who were younger or with a more severe condition were more likely to undergo genetic testing, a new analysis has found.

The new method may be useful in future noninvasive prenatal tests that rely on the analysis of DNA from fetal cells instead of cell-free fetal DNA.

A Drug or What?

The FDA has yet to determine if fecal microbiome transplants should be treated like a drug or like a blood transfusion, the New York Times reports.

In PLOS this week: small bowel adenocarcinoma mutation signatures, omic analysis of M. tuberculosis strains, and more.

In PNAS this week: DNA damage associated with e-cigarette exposure, inflammasome inhibition by OLT1177, and more.

In PNAS this week: cautionary note for cross-species functional genomic comparisons, chimeric pig models of X-linked diseases, and more.

The Brown University spinout wants to apply its algorithms to help improve personalized cancer treatments.

A Brown University-led team demonstrated the utility of its "massively parallel splicing assay," or MaPSy, assay by profiling splice effects for thousands of mutations.

A genome-wide association study and meta-analysis uncovered several possible ties to multiple keratinocyte cancer versus single keratinocyte cancer cases.

The researchers used the ligase to detect Ebola transcripts and suggest it could be applied to in vitro diagnostics and sequencing.

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President Donald Trump might not approve the stricter standards the US Food and Drug Administration is developing for authorizing a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, according to Politico.

Wired reports that Oxitec has now developed a genetically modified fall armyworm.

A large genetic study finds SARS-CoV-2 viruses with a certain variant are spreading more than others, according to the Washington Post.

In Nature this week: sister-chromatid-sensitive chromosome conformation capture approach, and more.