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Brigham and Women's Hospital

In PLOS this week: genomic and transcriptomic analysis of conjunctival melanoma, phylogenetic analysis of Clostridioides difficile, and more.

In PNAS this week: role of USF2 in refractory rheumatoid arthritis, thymus-associated cells may show up post-thymectomy in myasthenia gravis patients, and more.

The APOE-ε4 allele, a major genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, conveys more risk among Cuban than other Latino populations, the analysis found.

In PLOS this week: analysis of link between somatic copy number and telomere length, sequencing study of individuals with gallbladder S. Typhi colonization, and more.

In Genome Research this week: assay for profiling chromatin accessibility, analysis of genetic variants among malaria-transmitting mosquitoes, and more.

Researchers are continuing to collect data on economic, racial, and other factors that could be addressed to make precision medicine access more equitable.

Irvine, California-based Fluxergy is working with the MGB Center for COVID Innovation to evaluate the firm's research-use-only COVID-19 testing platform.

Using Genotype-Tissue Expression project samples, researchers put together gene regulatory networks for 29 tissue types, uncovering extensive sex-related regulatory differences.

The Bay Area startup is offering a no-touch method to separate cell populations for downstream analysis in genomics and synthetic biology applications.

In Science this week: Genetic Probability tool identifies likely diagnoses in 45 percent of inflammatory arthritis cases, and more.

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Imperial College London researchers are shifting away from testing a COVID-19 vaccine to focus on combating newly emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants, the Independent says.

According to the Associated Press, genetic genealogy has helped law enforcement officials identify an unknown victim of the Green River Killer.

In PNAS this week: target to reduce chemotherapy-induced cardiac injury, tool finds ancient endogenous RNA viruses, and more.

Moderna reports its vaccine is effective against new SARS-CoV-2 strains, though it is also developing a booster, according to the New York Times.