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BC Cancer Foundation

Epic Sciences will donate its No Cell Left Behind platform to the clinical trial, which will enroll about 1,000 patients over three years.

The funding will support the British Columbia Cancer Agency's effort to use genome sequencing to develop personalized treatment strategies for cancer patients.

Among 100 adults and six children recruited between June 2012 and August 2014, most were successfully sequenced and a majority of those had actionable results.

Researchers leading the POG trial are hoping this year to sequence the whole genomes of 300 cancer patients in an effort to find the best treatment options for them.

The goal is to analyze a variety of genomic techniques, including sequencing, to develop a test that will determine whether AML patients should receive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation.

The Genome British Columbia program will kick off with funding totaling around $9 million for three personalized medicine studies.

The US Food and Drug Administration is to announce stricter standards for emergency authorizations of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, reports the Washington Post.

The Associated Press reports Johnson & Johnson is starting a late-stage clinical trial of its candidate SARS-CoV-2 vaccine.

Bloomberg reports the budget of Operation Warp Speed is actually $18 billion, higher than the number typically cited.

In Genome Research this week: genomic analysis reveals role of super-spreaders in SARS-CoV-2, epigenetic drivers of cancer, and more.