BC Cancer Foundation

The funding will support the British Columbia Cancer Agency's effort to use genome sequencing to develop personalized treatment strategies for cancer patients.

Among 100 adults and six children recruited between June 2012 and August 2014, most were successfully sequenced and a majority of those had actionable results.

Researchers leading the POG trial are hoping this year to sequence the whole genomes of 300 cancer patients in an effort to find the best treatment options for them.

The goal is to analyze a variety of genomic techniques, including sequencing, to develop a test that will determine whether AML patients should receive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation.

The Genome British Columbia program will kick off with funding totaling around $9 million for three personalized medicine studies.

New Mexico is re-doing its proposed science education standards after criticism, the Associated Press reports.

Agbio executives say gene editing will speed up breeding efforts, according to the Wall Street Journal.

La Trobe University's Jenny Graves has won the $250,000 Prime Minister's Prize for Science, the Guardian reports.

In Cell this week: post-treatment changes to melanoma genome, multi-omics analysis of muscle-invasive bladder cancer, and more.