BC Cancer Foundation

The funding will support the British Columbia Cancer Agency's effort to use genome sequencing to develop personalized treatment strategies for cancer patients.

Among 100 adults and six children recruited between June 2012 and August 2014, most were successfully sequenced and a majority of those had actionable results.

Researchers leading the POG trial are hoping this year to sequence the whole genomes of 300 cancer patients in an effort to find the best treatment options for them.

The goal is to analyze a variety of genomic techniques, including sequencing, to develop a test that will determine whether AML patients should receive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation.

The Genome British Columbia program will kick off with funding totaling around $9 million for three personalized medicine studies.

The UK's Human Fertility and Embryology Authority calls for consumer genetic testing companies to warn customers that testing could uncover family secrets, according to the Guardian.

The New York Times reports that United Nations delegates have been discussing how to govern the genetic resources of the deep sea.

Researchers have transplanted edited cells into mice that appear to combat cocaine addiction, New Scientist reports.

In PNAS this week: analysis of proteolytic enzymes secreted by circulating tumor cells, phylogenetic study of Fv1 evolution, and more.