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BC Cancer Foundation

Epic Sciences will donate its No Cell Left Behind platform to the clinical trial, which will enroll about 1,000 patients over three years.

The funding will support the British Columbia Cancer Agency's effort to use genome sequencing to develop personalized treatment strategies for cancer patients.

Among 100 adults and six children recruited between June 2012 and August 2014, most were successfully sequenced and a majority of those had actionable results.

Researchers leading the POG trial are hoping this year to sequence the whole genomes of 300 cancer patients in an effort to find the best treatment options for them.

The goal is to analyze a variety of genomic techniques, including sequencing, to develop a test that will determine whether AML patients should receive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation.

The Genome British Columbia program will kick off with funding totaling around $9 million for three personalized medicine studies.

The US has sent its formal notice of withdrawal from the World Health Organization, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Science reports that a draft spending bill would increase the US National Institutes of Health budget by 13 percent.

The Harvard Crimson reports that Harvard and MIT are suing the Department of Homeland Security and ICE over the new international student visa policy.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: algorithm to determine molecular sequence types and other microbial features, computational method to uncover R-loop structures, and more.