BC Cancer Foundation

The funding will support the British Columbia Cancer Agency's effort to use genome sequencing to develop personalized treatment strategies for cancer patients.

Among 100 adults and six children recruited between June 2012 and August 2014, most were successfully sequenced and a majority of those had actionable results.

Researchers leading the POG trial are hoping this year to sequence the whole genomes of 300 cancer patients in an effort to find the best treatment options for them.

The goal is to analyze a variety of genomic techniques, including sequencing, to develop a test that will determine whether AML patients should receive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation.

The Genome British Columbia program will kick off with funding totaling around $9 million for three personalized medicine studies.

The UK's Nuffield Council on Bioethics says genetically modifying human embryos could be morally permissible, according to the Guardian.

A new Nature Biotechnology paper reports that CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing can lead to large deletions or complex rearrangements that could be pathogenic.

The Wall Street Journal likens a prototype developed by Synthetic Genomics to a "biological fax machine."

In PNAS this week: strategy for reactivating Rett syndrome-linked MECP2, small molecules able to suppress Staphylococcus aureus virulence, and more.